Category Archives: New Staff

12 Oct

The New Nutrition Team

Hemoglobin analysis in DHS surveys in carried out with a portable HemoCue analyzer.

Did you know that nutrition is one of the most published topics using data from The DHS Program? This shows what a major resource The DHS Program is for nutrition-related policy, programs, and research. Recognizing the important contribution of nutrition data, two new nutrition experts have recently joined The DHS Program team, Drs. Sorrel Namaste and Rukundo K. Benedict.

As our new nutrition experts, they will manage all aspects of nutrition data collection and use, working to:

  • Ensure provision of high-quality nutrition data within The DHS Program
  • Explore innovations for nutrition data in low- and middle-income countries
  • Support evidence-based programming and policies with relevant and timely nutrition data
  • Build capacity in nutrition data measurement, analysis, and use around the world

Some of The DHS Program’s recent activities on nutrition include the new Hemoglobin report, and we are also currently seeking applications for the 2018 DHS Fellows Program. To stay up-to-date with more nutrition activities, sign up for our upcoming nutrition newsletter.

So join us in welcoming our new nutrition team in the comment section, and learn more about them in their bios below. If you still have any questions or comments, you can reach out to them directly at nutrition@dhsprogram.com.


Dr. Sorrel Namaste is the Senior Nutrition Technical Advisor for The DHS Program. She is an epidemiologist with expertise in nutrition assessment and implementation research. Dr. Namaste has a particular interest in the use of data to strengthen the feedback loop between the scientific, policy, and implementation communities. Prior to joining The DHS Program, she was the Anemia Team Lead for the USAID-funded SPRING project. In this capacity, she provided technical assistance to governments to develop national strategies, supported program implementation, and contributed to the formation of global policies. Previously, she also worked for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) where she was responsible for supporting large-scale global nutrition research projects. While at NIH, she served as the co-principal investigator on the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutrition Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) Project. She completed her DrPH at George Washington University and holds an MHS from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Global Epidemiology.

Dr. Rukundo K. Benedict is a Nutrition Technical Specialist for The DHS Program. She is a public health nutrition practitioner with expertise in infant and young child feeding (IYCF), water-sanitation hygiene (WASH), community health systems and the delivery of integrated interventions in low-resource settings. Prior to joining The DHS Program, she worked as a postdoctoral associate at Cornell University on policy and program relevant projects. She led a project with UNICEF South Asia to examine the epidemiology of breastfeeding in South Asia and to explore the effectiveness of strategies to support breastfeeding and maternal nutrition and infant feeding counseling. She also conducted implementation research on the delivery of nutrition and nutrition sensitive interventions by community health workers in the Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial in rural Zimbabwe. She has a PhD in International Nutrition from Cornell University and an MSPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Photo Caption: Hemoglobin analysis in DHS surveys in carried out with a portable HemoCue analyzer

21 Feb

Spotlight on New Staff: Annē Linn

Name: Annē Linn

Position title: Communications Associate

Languages spoken: French, Spanish, Malinke, and I’ve been working on my Portuguese since starting at The DHS Program.

When not working, favorite place to visit:  Montana…there’s no place like home.

Favorite type of cuisine: Ooh, tough one…I like everything. I’m a wannabe vegetarian, so I’ll have to say fun, creative vegetarian cuisine.

Last good book you read: This was the hardest question on here, since I’ve read a lot of great books in the past few months. I recently read “American Gods” by Neil Gaiman for a book club and really enjoyed it.

Where would we find you on a Saturday?  Exploring DC and the surrounding area. There’s so much to do here!

First time you worked with DHS survey data: In graduate school, we used the 1997 Indonesia DHS in my course on Advanced Analysis for Nutrition Data.

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  A mask from Tanzania, a metal butterfly from Mexico, and a wedding picture of my husband and me on our tandem bike.


Namibia Demographic and Health Survey 2000 [FR141]What is your favorite survey final report cover?
   I took a field trip to the publications library to provide a more informed answer for this one. The winner was the 2000 Namibia DHS cover, which brought back amazing memories of climbing dunes in the Namib desert when I studied abroad there in 2005.

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why?  Children with fever for whom advice or treatment was sought the same or the next day. I care a lot about timely care seeking for malaria.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data?  I love STATcompiler. Somehow I had never come into contact with it before I started here. When I first started using it and saw how easy it was to quickly access and visualize data, I was so excited, but also bummed that I hadn’t found it earlier!

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?  As I said before, I am very passionate about access to and utilization of treatment for malaria. As a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal, I worked on a community-based model of proactive case detection for malaria that was designed to increase timely case management.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?  Working with stakeholders in-country to ensure that survey data is utilized in program and policy planning.

What has been your biggest surprise so far?  I guess it’s not a surprise, but I have been fascinated to be behind the scenes and see how a DHS survey comes together after having utilized the data for so long before starting here. It’s such a huge undertaking with so much hard work by so many people, both on the ground and here in Maryland.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? I have heard a lot about people being excited that I speak French, which is great, because I’m a huge language nerd and love speaking French.

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07 Dec

Spotlight on New Staff: Julia Fleuret

Name: Julia Fleuret

Position title:  Survey Manager

Languages spoken: English and French

Favorite type of cuisine: Anything not involving hardboiled eggs.

Last good book you read: Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner?: A Story of Women and Economics, by Katrine Marcal – very funny analysis/critique of traditional economic thinking.

When not working, favorite place to visit:  The northern California coast for gorgeous hiking/scenery.

Where would we find you on a Saturday?  Yoga, farmers’ market, library/bookstore – then back home for a baking project.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: During my first semester getting my MPH at Tulane I used Mali DHS data in a nutrition class.

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  My desk is a mess, so let’s focus on the bulletin board: a postcard from Kansas City, a ticket from a highlife concert in Accra, art flyers from Kampala, and a snapshot (from the days of film cameras!) of a tailor’s door in Bamako.

2011 Uganda DHSWhat is your favorite survey final report cover?   I am partial to the 2011 Uganda DHS and its cheerful jumble of sunflowers, although that might be because I’ve been carrying it around for the last 6 months while supporting the 2016 Uganda DHS (which is currently in the field.)

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why?  I feel like nutrition is the foundation of health, so the children’s anthropometry results in Chapter 11 (Nutrition of Children and Adults) is one of the first things I look at in a report.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data?  I am in some ways a dinosaur, and I like hard copies of reports.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why? Since starting at the DHS I’ve become more interested in collecting data to understand more about disability in a population – both for the overall prevalence of disability but perhaps more interestingly, to look at health outcome disparities by disability status. We developed an optional module on disability for use in the Household Questionnaire (based on the Washington Group on Disability Statistics’ Short Set of Disability Questions) and it will be interesting to see if more countries adopt it and how they use those data.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?  Well, I’ve been here for just under 18 months, so I’m not sure I’m new anymore – but I am really looking forward to seeing the data as they come out for Uganda, and working with the implementing agency to put out the Key Indicators Report and Final Report early next year.

What has been your biggest surprise so far?  The iodine test kits really work! I mean, I didn’t expect them to not work – but I felt like a magician actually turning the salt sample purple!

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? A sense of humor & the results of the aforementioned baking projects.

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20 Jul

Spotlight on New Staff: Trinadh Dontamsetti

Name: Trinadh Dontamsetti

Position title: Health Geographic Analyst

Languages spoken: English, Spanish, Telugu

When not working, favorite place to visit:  You mean other than grandma’s house to get some home-cooked food? I have a definite soft spot for my hometown of Tampa, Florida and its perpetually great weather (and mom’s home-cooked food).

Favorite type of cuisine: I can’t say I’ve got a favorite, if only because I’ll eat anything and everything that looks good.  I most often catch myself cooking Italian or Chinese food, however.

Last good book you read: “Man’s Search for Meaning” by Viktor Frankl.  While really heavy, it’s one of the most inspiring books I’ve ever read.

Where would we find you on a Saturday?  Any number of places, depending on the time! A typical Saturday includes a long workout at the gym, a longer drive on winding roads (it’s my go-to stress relief), and a trip into DC to undo my workout by eating far too much.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: During my Master’s program at the University of South Florida, using 2013 Nigeria DHS GPS data as part of a study on schistosomiasis transmission.

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  I’m a minimalist, so not much (that’s a better way of saying I’m too lazy to decorate).  I do have a tiny, magnetic alpaca that a friend brought me from Peru, and I plan to surround him with souvenirs once I get back from my first DHS trip to Ghana!

What is your favorite survey final report cover?   2010-11 Senegal DHS.  I’m a huge fan of geometric art.

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why? One of my major focuses during my Master’s program was vector-borne disease (specifically Integrated Vector Management as an alternative way of combating these diseases), so the indoor residual spraying indicator is of particular interest to me.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data?  You can’t go wrong with the Spatial Data Repository (SDR) and STATCompiler!

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?  I’ve been most fascinated and passionate about studying tuberculosis (TB), given that it’s been around for so long and yet continues to be such a burden all over the world.  With few exceptions, I focused almost all of my projects during grad school (including my final thesis) on studying some aspect of TB.  Since there’s so much overlap between TB and other diseases (most notably HIV/AIDS), I’ve been trying to familiarize myself further with the HIV/AIDS work done by DHS so that I can get a better understanding of the interplay between these two diseases.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?  I’m extremely excited that I’ll be working on analytical projects and conducting research as part of my work here, which makes all those late nights in the computer lab during grad school doing analytical projects and conducting research seem just a little bit more worth it in the long run.

What has been your biggest surprise so far?  The incredible amount of support I so routinely receive from everyone in the office as I settle into my position, and the continued opportunities I’m being given to learn new things but also contribute to ongoing projects by applying the skills I’ve brought in.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? A public health-centric GIS perspective, an unhealthy obsession with food (did I mention it at least three times already in this post?), an even less healthy obsession with superheroes and cars, and a nearly endless supply of optimism and sarcasm (could this be any more cliché?).

11 May

Spotlight on New Staff: Lindsay Mallick

lindsayandaviName: Lindsay Mallick

Position title:  Research Associate/Data Analyst

Languages spoken: English, French

When not working, favorite place to visit: Target. Just kidding.  But I’d love to vacation somewhere, anywhere, again one day.  Can someone spot me some leave? I can’t seem to save any since I came back from maternity leave!

Favorite type of cuisine: Anything I don’t have to cook or can’t cook myself, like Indian and sushi. Yum!

Last good book you read: “Expecting Better” by Emily Oster. She’s an economist who debunks a lot of the overly-prudent pregnancy restrictions with sound research and presents statistics on common pregnancy fears, myths, and the nitty gritty of labor and delivery.

Where would we find you on a Saturday?   At home, spending quality time with my family.  AKA, dancing to toddler radio, finding new places to hide the TV remote controls, narrowly avoiding lego foot injuries, and passing out early after a blissful 30 minutes of TV and cuddling with my husband.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: At Tulane for my MPH program, using the 2006 Mali DHS dataset to look at genital cutting for a research project in a class.

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  Pictures of my son and husband; trinkets from around the world, kindly brought to me from my traveling coworkers.

What is your favorite survey final report cover?   2000-01 Mauritania DHS because that’s where I served in the Peace Corps!

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why? Family planning—I’m always interested to learn what the latest contraceptive prevalence rate and method mix is in a new survey, and see how that has changed over time.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data? From my hard drive, where I have many datasets stored for everyday use.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?  It’s hard to choose just one.  They are all so important and intricately linked.  In the Peace Corps, I focused on water and sanitation, because they’re so fundamental to health.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?  There is so much to learn working here, from new survey findings to working with DHS data.

What has been your biggest surprise so far?  The kind and supportive work environment—I really lucked out with this job.  My colleagues and supervisors are truly amazing people!

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? Funny stories, pictures and videos of life with a toddler.

17 Jun

Spotlight on New Staff: Hamdy Moussa

Hamdy Moussa

Hamdy Moussa

Name: Hamdy Moussa

Position title: Survey Manager, Service Provision Assessment (SPA) Surveys

Languages spoken: Arabic and English

When not working, favorite place to visit: New York and Cairo

Favorite type of cuisine: Mediterranean and Italian

Last good book you read: Health Systems Performance Assessment: Debates, Methods and Empiricism, WHO

Where would we find you on a Saturday? With my family for outdoor activities and exploring the Washington metropolitan area.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: 2004 Egypt Service Provision Assessment Survey

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now? 2014 Bangladesh Health Facility Survey (BHFS) as well as plans for the 2015 Egypt Service Provision Assessment Survey (ESPA) and 2015 Jordan Service Provision Assessment Survey (JSPA)

2012 Jordan DHS Final Report

2012 Jordan PFHS Final Report

What is your favorite survey final report cover? The 2012 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey with the wonderful photo of the monastery in the ancient city of Petra, Jordan.

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why?  Knowledge and prevalence of hepatitis C, as hepatitis C represents a major challenge to the health system in Egypt.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data? The website.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?  Viral hepatitis is a critical public health issue in Egypt. The 2008 EDHS provided Egypt with the first nationally representative data on the scope of hepatitis C epidemic in Egypt. The survey found that 15% of women and men age 15-59 years had antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in their blood, and 10% had an active HCV infection that represents a major challenge to the health system in Egypt.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position? First to be fully integrated in both SPA and DHS surveys, and second to manage more SPA surveys in different countries.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? I am bringing my technical, consulting skills in health systems and biomarkers, and looking forward to learning more from the distinguished DHS Program staff.

16 Apr

Spotlight on New Staff: Aileen Marshall

Aileen Marshall

Aileen Marshall

Name: Aileen M. J. Marshall

Position title:  Knowledge Management (KM)/Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist

Languages spoken: English, German, and a tiny bit of French and Spanish

When not working, favorite place to visit:  Germany (that’s where I am from, and since my family is still there, it’s a no-brainer), but I would love to go back to Sydney one day. I also absolutely adore Belgium and the Netherlands.

Favorite type of cuisine: I love Mediterranean as well as Indian and Ethiopian and Lebanese cuisine. I am always open to trying new stuff though, as long as it’s not spicy or contains any of the gazillion things I am allergic to!

Last good book you read: Essential SharePoint 2013 … oh, wait, you mean not work-related? Does proof-reading my own “in the works” book count? If not, then I have to say it was Thief of Hope by our very own Cindy Young Turner, and prior to that The Office of Mercy by Ariel Djanikian.

Where would we find you on a Saturday? Volunteering at the Alexandria Animal Shelter, being out and about with my AmStaff Dutch, at Tyson’s Corner or any Barnes & Noble in the area.

Aileen's AmStaff, Dutch.

Aileen’s AmStaff, Dutch.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: September 2, 2014

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  Three books about KM, SharePoint and Global Health Indicators. Also a gigantic pink paperclip and an oversized silver fountain pen.

2013-14 DR Congo DHS Final Report

2013-14 Democratic Republic of the Congo DHS Final Report

What is your favorite survey final report cover? 2013-14 Democratic Republic of the Congo DHS

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why? Chapter 12: Nutrition of Women and Children. I am pretty obsessed with nutrition in general (and my own intake), so reading about nutrition in other countries is always interesting and very eye-opening.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data? In general, I prefer online access, but being a librarian, I can’t resist looking at hard copies now and then!

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why? Access to health care and nutrition in general.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position? I look forward to working with so many different people from all over the world. I’ve always enjoyed working in global environments, so I feel right at home already. I also look forward to implementing a KM Strategy and teaching people about new ways to collaborate and work, and maybe traveling to different countries to implement KM activities on a local level, not just program-wide.

What has been your biggest surprise so far? That everybody brings back food from their trips, and the speed of which said food disappears from the kitchen again!  I am also amazed that people are more than willing to share what they know, to help and to answer questions. Last but not least I greatly enjoy all the stories people have to tell when they return from their trips.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? I am excited to share my enthusiasm for KM with my colleagues, and hopefully some fresh perspectives on how they can benefit from new activities. For the pet lovers among us, I have plenty of dog/cat/turtle stories to make you laugh, and I am hopeful that I will join the ranks of DHS fiction authors by publishing a SciFi novel (some light reading when you are not busy with reading data and reports).

31 Mar

Spotlight on New Staff: Matt Pagan

This part of a series of posts introducing readers to new staff at The DHS Program. Welcome, Matt!

Name: Matt Pagan

Matt Pagan, GIS analyst

Matt Pagan, GIS Research Assistant

Position title:  GIS Research Assistant, which means I make maps, work on DHS GPS datasets, and help develop and maintain our GIS infrastructure that allows us to share our geo data.

Languages spoken: English, and an embarrassingly small amount of Spanish (¿Se habla inglés?). I normally don’t speak in code, but I’m fluent in Python, JavaScript, and Java as well.

When not working, favorite place to visit:  333 W. Camden St., Birdland, MD

Favorite type of cuisine: Is pizza a type of cuisine?

Last good book you read: Maphead by Ken Jennings. One of my life goals is to get on Jeopardy: I have tried out thrice to no avail—as a kid, a teen, and a college student—but I hope my increased knowledge of world geography from working here at The DHS Program will finally get me over the hump. Anyway, this book is essentially 200 pages or so of the greatest Jeopardy champion of all time geeking out about maps, so, yeah, right up my alley.

Where would we find you on a Saturday?  There’s nothing like sleeping in on Saturday, but I guess if I’m awake, you might find me at the movies, making music, or just hanging out, having fun.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: My first day on the job.

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  My Oriole Bird magnet and 2014 AL East pennant, a flower made out of pipe cleaners bestowed upon me by Sunita, a dozen or so post-its of increasing age and decreasing relevancy, and many, many maps.

2013-14 DR Congo DHS Final Report

2013-14 DR Congo DHS Final Report

What is your favorite survey final report cover?   The 2013-14 Democratic Republic of the Congo DHS. I am a bit biased: this was the first survey I worked on!

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why?  I think the household characteristics chapter is pretty cool; one indicator I am especially interested in is whether or not households have mobile phones. It’s intriguing to know what kind of spread mobile networks have in less connected countries—I hope this will continue to be developed into a powerful method for reaching out and helping people as more robust tech finds its way into all parts of the world.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data?  I have to get a plug in for SDR, where you can grab shapefiles with DHS indicators pre-loaded, but I use the API the most—it’s the fastest way to answer 95% of the questions I have.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?  I came to The DHS Program with very little background in demography or health, so I don’t have any issue in particular—I find myself fascinated (and sometimes sobered, sadly) by all the different issues we touch on in our surveys, and I am excited to continue learning more. If there is an issue that surrounds DHS that I am passionate about, it is open data: any information system (including GIS) is only as good as the data put in it, and equitable access to accurate data is key to making all the cool technology we have relevant to users worldwide. This is certainly a topic that is bigger than just population or health, but I am glad that The DHS Program plays a part in providing free and accessible data for researchers working in those fields.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?  The chance to hone my cartography skills, being able to use my extensive ArcGIS knowledge, and the opportunity to work with a great team.

What has been your biggest surprise so far?  How nice and accommodating everyone here at The DHS Program has been to me. I came into this position with plenty of technical knowledge but no experience in the public health domain, and yet I’ve never felt out of place while I learn more from everyone here. One other surprise: the amount of free food people bring in here is insane. It has truly been a nourishing experience for the mind and the body.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? GIS know-how, my information systems background, map nerdery, a keen eye, boisterous laughter, that Baltimore charm, millennial sensibilities, up-to-date pop-culture references.

22 Jan

Spotlight on New Staff: Shireen Assaf

This part of a series of posts introducing readers to new staff at The DHS Program. Welcome,Shireen!

Shireen Assaf, Senior Research Associate

Shireen Assaf, Senior Research Associate

Name: Shireen Assaf

Position title:  Senior Research Associate

Languages spoken: English, Arabic and basic Italian

When not working, favorite place to visit:  Lebanon and Italy

Favorite type of cuisine: Mediterranean food (especially Middle-Eastern and Italian) but I also love Thai and Japanese.

Last good book you read: The Shoemaker’s Wife.

Where would we find you on a Saturday?  Either in some sort of exercise class or visiting my sister and her family in Arlington.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: During my Masters studies.

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now?  Pictures of family and old pictures of Palestine.

Special Report on Intervention Zones in Niger based on the 2012 DHS

Special Report on Intervention Zones in Niger based on the 2012 DHS

What is your favorite survey final report cover?  The Special Report on Intervention Zones in Niger based on the 2012 DHS. Just look at that  face!

Favorite chapter or indicator, and why?  If I had to choose one indicator perhaps it would be modern contraceptive use. This one indicator can give you a lot of insight about a country, from demographics to gender issues.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data? STATcomplier for quick access to indicators and trends, and The DHS Program website for the final reports and other published material.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?

Family planning and gender issues. So much still needs to be achieved in these areas and studying the factors associated with them is one of the issues I am passionate about. I am also very passionate about studying trends in various health indicators both temporal and spatial.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?

I look forward to working on different analytical and research studies each year for different countries and topics. I love research and analysis and I am happy to be in a position that allows to me conduct analysis on new topics using new data each year. I am also looking forward to learning from my work here and from my colleagues who are all very cooperative and great to work with.

What has been your biggest surprise so far?

The national diversity of The DHS Program team. Also the amount of work required to manage the DHS in all its aspects; survey management, training, data processing, analysis, and dissemination.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)?

I look forward to bringing my research and analytical skills and to contributing the best of my abilities to The DHS Program research activities.

23 Jun

Spotlight on New Staff: Luis Sevilla

This is the third in a series of posts introducing readers to new staff at The DHS Program. Welcome, Luis!

Luis Sevilla

Luis Sevilla

Name: Luis Sevilla

Position title:  Survey Manager

Languages spoken: Spanish, English, and Portuguese

When not working, favorite place to visit: El Salvador

Favorite type of cuisine: Peruvian and Mozambican cuisine

Last good book you read: An old book but one of my favorites – The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

Where could we find you on a Saturday? Exploring Maryland and Washington DC with my wife.

First time you worked with DHS survey data: In graduate school.

2012 Indonesia DHS

2012 Indonesia DHS

What is on your desk (or bulletin board/wall) right now? Ekeko doll (Peru) and Ndebele doll (South Africa) for good luck as well as several documents for my work in Kenya and Mozambique.

What is your favorite survey final report cover?  The 2012 Indonesia DHS.

What’s your favorite way to access The DHS Program’s data?  I use the mobile app as well as the DHS website. I am looking forward to trying out the IDHS website.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?  I am very interested in HIV indicators. I consider vulnerability to disease to be both a cause and effect of poverty and one worth exploring further. Specifically, I am interested in learning more about the impact of HIV/AIDS on food security and human capital.

What are you most looking forward to about your new position?  I am looking forward to collaborating with other DHS Program staff in implementing DHS surveys. I am also looking forward to working in and traveling to different countries.

What has been your biggest surprise so far? The complexity at each stage of the survey process.

What do you look forward to bringing to The DHS Program (job-related or not!)? I’m looking forward to applying what I have learned from previous survey work and to gaining more experience & knowledge from fellow DHS staff.

And lastly…who are you rooting for in the #DHSWorldCupIn an ideal world, the winning team would be from a new country (i.e., I don’t want to see Brazil, Italy, Argentina, etc. win). Among DHS countries, I would love to see Ghana win, especially since they almost made it to the semifinals in 2010. They have a good team, but the problem is that they have a really tough group! It would be amazing to see an African team win the World Cup! Among all 32 countries, I’m rooting for Mexico and Chile, as well.

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