19 Aug 2016

#DHSgames Week Two – Round Two

It’s been another big week in the #DHSgames.

medal-count-8

Before the final weekend, Brazil moves into first place in our games with 15 medals – five gold, five silver, and five bronze. Kazakhstan slipped into second place – of its five medals, three are gold. Azerbaijan makes an entrance into the top three for the first time during these games with 10 medals. The last DHS in Azerbaijan was conducted in 2006. South Africa, with nine medals, is also a contender for the final medal count to be released on Monday after this weekend’s closing events.

Medals for DHS countries this week include Indonesia’s gold in mixed doubles badminton, Jordan‘s in men’s 68 kg taekwondo, and Ukraine‘s gold in the men’s 200m canoe sprint. The men’s welterweight boxing final ended in gold for Kazakhstan and silver for Uzbekistan. India and Tunisia both won bronze in the women’s 58 kg freestyle wrestling. It has been a big week for Brazil, with gold medals in women’s judo, men’s boxing, men’s pole vault, women’s sailing, and men’s beach volleyball.

With all the Track and Field that’s been happening this week, let’s talk about Kenya and Ethiopia in the distance races. In every marathon race since 1996, at least one Kenyan or Ethiopian has medaled (with the exception of one race, in which there was a medalist born in Ethiopia but competing for the US).  For this year’s #DHSgames, let’s do a mini medal count for the women’s distance events:

marathon10,000

1500-with-credit

In addition to the countries of Kenya and Ethiopia, you may notice another repetition in this medal count: Dibaba. The Dibaba sisters, Tirunesh and Genzebe, are part of what is called the fastest family on the planet (Mare Dibaba is unrelated). Tirunesh and Genzebe grew up in a hut without electricity. The 2011 Ethiopia DHS found that 23% of households have electricity—up from 13% in 2000. According to a profile of the sisters, their mother credits much of their success to having grown up on milk from the family’s cows.

We can use DHS data to examine topics such as nutrition in Ethiopia. Indicators can be examined in depth to see how they vary within a country by wealth or among other background characteristics. For example, in Ethiopia, anemia prevalence among children age 6-59 months decreases as household wealth increases.

Children with any anemia

We calculate wealth quintiles through the Wealth Index, which measures a household’s living standards according to assets (such as farm animals) rather than income. Indicators can then be broken down by wealth quintile to better understand patterns within a country.

Equestrian-Wealth-Index-AL

 

We’ll be watching to see how Ethiopia and Kenya do in the upcoming men’s marathon. The 2016 Ethiopia DHS is also ongoing, so stay tuned for those results as well. The excitement will continue even after the close of this year’s #DHSgames.

Written by The DHS Program

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

The information provided on this Web site is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

The DHS Program, ICF
530 Gaither Road, Suite 500, Rockville, MD 20850
Tel: +1 (301) 407-6500 • Fax: +1 (301) 407-6501
dhsprogram.com

Anthropometry measurement (height and weight) is a core component of DHS surveys that is used to generate indicators on nutritional status. The Biomarker Questionnaire now includes questions on clothing and hairstyle interference on measurements for both women and children for improved interpretation.