Category Archives: Campaigns

02 Dec 2019

16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence

The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence campaign is back in action for 2019 under the theme “Orange the World: Generation Equality Stands against Rape!” This year, The DHS Program is highlighting sexual and physical violence indicators, as well as help seeking behavior in Tajikistan, Pakistan, Nigeria, Benin, and Mali.

Click on a graph below to open the indicator in STATcompiler. Use STATcompiler to compare other domestic violence indicators across countries, and share your results on social media using #orangetheword and #generationeqaulity. You can even add additional background characteristics and view the data over time or by region. For more ways to use STATcompiler, watch our STATcompiler tutorials.

 

Still want to do more? Share these 16 days messages from UN Women’s social media toolkit. Additionally, try The DHS Program’s Gender mini tool to compare indicators of gender inequality, women’s empowerment, and gender norms all in one easy tool.

11 Jul 2018

World Population Day 2018

It’s that time of the year again, and we’re back with another World Population Day #PopPyramid Quiz! Population pyramids are great ways to visualize a country’s distribution of various age groups in a population by sex.

We also created an infographic with population pyramids from recent Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). Scroll down below the quiz to use the infographic as a guide!

So if you think you’re ready to take on the 2018 #PopPyramid Quiz? Get started below!

Click here to open the quiz in a new window

Let us know how you did the comments below, and don’t forget to share the quiz to give others a chance to test their knowledge on population pyramids!

11 Jul 2017

World Population Day 2017

How well do you know your population pyramids? Celebrate World Population Day with The DHS Program’s Guess the Population Pyramid Quiz!

See how you stack up against others and share your results below in the comment section, on Facebook, or Twitter! We are also having a live version of Guess the #PopPyramid on Twitter July 11 at 10AM EST.

Take the full-screen version of the quiz here.

Good luck!

22 Aug 2016

#DHSgames Final Recap

As the 2016 Olympics come to a close, so do the #DHSgames. Our final medalists are as follows:  Brazil, with seven gold, six silver, and six bronze medals for a total of 19 medals;  Azerbaijan, with one gold, seven silver and 10 bronze medals for a total of 18 medals; and Kazakhstan, with three gold, five silver and nine bronze medals for a total of 17 medals. Kenya is the runner-up with 13 medals, six of which are gold.

Several Olympic (OR) and world records (WR) were set by athletes from DHS countries:

  • OR:  Sukanya Srisurat, Thailand, women’s 58kg in weightlifting
  • OR & WR:  Nijat Rahimov, Kazakhstan, men’s 77kg in weightlifting
  • WR:  Almaz Ayana, Ethiopia, women’s 10,000m in athletics
  • OR & WR:  Wayde van Niekerk, South Africa, men’s 400m in athletics
  • OR:  Thiago Braz da Silva, Brazil, men’s pole vault
  • OR:  Conseslus Kipruto, Kenya, men’s 3000m steeplechase
  • OR:  Vivian Kepkemoi Cheruiyot, Kenya, women’s 5000m in athletics

Thank you to everyone who participated in The DHS Games! We hope you enjoyed our coverage of countries that we have worked with. If you particularly enjoyed our blog content, we encourage you to subscribe to receive weekly to biweekly updates.

You can also check out all the infographics shared throughout The DHS Games on Pinterest, as well as scroll through the #DHSgames feed for a look back at our Twitter coverage.

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19 Aug 2016

#DHSgames Week Two – Round Two

It’s been another big week in the #DHSgames.

medal-count-8

Before the final weekend, Brazil moves into first place in our games with 15 medals – five gold, five silver, and five bronze. Kazakhstan slipped into second place – of its five medals, three are gold. Azerbaijan makes an entrance into the top three for the first time during these games with 10 medals. The last DHS in Azerbaijan was conducted in 2006. South Africa, with nine medals, is also a contender for the final medal count to be released on Monday after this weekend’s closing events.

Medals for DHS countries this week include Indonesia’s gold in mixed doubles badminton, Jordan‘s in men’s 68 kg taekwondo, and Ukraine‘s gold in the men’s 200m canoe sprint. The men’s welterweight boxing final ended in gold for Kazakhstan and silver for Uzbekistan. India and Tunisia both won bronze in the women’s 58 kg freestyle wrestling. It has been a big week for Brazil, with gold medals in women’s judo, men’s boxing, men’s pole vault, women’s sailing, and men’s beach volleyball.

With all the Track and Field that’s been happening this week, let’s talk about Kenya and Ethiopia in the distance races. In every marathon race since 1996, at least one Kenyan or Ethiopian has medaled (with the exception of one race, in which there was a medalist born in Ethiopia but competing for the US).  For this year’s #DHSgames, let’s do a mini medal count for the women’s distance events:

marathon10,000

1500-with-credit

In addition to the countries of Kenya and Ethiopia, you may notice another repetition in this medal count: Dibaba. The Dibaba sisters, Tirunesh and Genzebe, are part of what is called the fastest family on the planet (Mare Dibaba is unrelated). Tirunesh and Genzebe grew up in a hut without electricity. The 2011 Ethiopia DHS found that 23% of households have electricity—up from 13% in 2000. According to a profile of the sisters, their mother credits much of their success to having grown up on milk from the family’s cows.

We can use DHS data to examine topics such as nutrition in Ethiopia. Indicators can be examined in depth to see how they vary within a country by wealth or among other background characteristics. For example, in Ethiopia, anemia prevalence among children age 6-59 months decreases as household wealth increases.

Children with any anemia

We calculate wealth quintiles through the Wealth Index, which measures a household’s living standards according to assets (such as farm animals) rather than income. Indicators can then be broken down by wealth quintile to better understand patterns within a country.

Equestrian-Wealth-Index-AL

 

We’ll be watching to see how Ethiopia and Kenya do in the upcoming men’s marathon. The 2016 Ethiopia DHS is also ongoing, so stay tuned for those results as well. The excitement will continue even after the close of this year’s #DHSgames.

15 Aug 2016

#DHSgames Week Two – Round One

It’s been an exciting week for the #DHSgames, particularly for female athletes of DHS countries. We support women’s empowerment, whether in the form of athletic achievement or as an indicator of development.

First, let’s review this week’s medal count. Kazakhstan is now in first place with ten medals, followed by South Africa  with seven medals, and Uzbekistan with six medals, replacing Thailand and Brazil from last week. Kenya is close behind with five medals – two gold and three silver.

We have witnessed many history-making firsts. Chierika Ukogu of Nigeria is the first African to compete in a rowing event, placing second in her women’s single sculls group. Nigeria is also making great strides in health. The 2015 Nigeria MIS Key Indicators Report shows malaria prevalence by microscopy decreased from 42% among children age 6-59 months in 2010 to 27% in 2015.

Dipa Karmakar is the first female gymnast from India to qualify, ranking 4th in the women’s vault finals. Though she was just .15 points short of winning the bronze, her presence and performance have made a huge impact. As early as 1992-93, data from the National Family and Health Surveys have allowed program managers and policy makers to make an impact on the health of India’s population.

Many new bars were set in athletics competition. Ethiopian long-distance runner Almaz Ayana crushed the world record while earning a gold medal in the women’s 10,000m race. The ongoing 2016 Ethiopia DHS will reveal where Ethiopia has made notable improvements in health indicators.

Jemima Sumgong became the first Kenyan woman to win gold for a marathon event. Kenya has made impressive gains in malaria prevention, where children’s use of insecticide-treated nets has increased by 50 percentage points in a little over a decade.

The #DHSgames will come to a close this weekend, so watch our Twitter feeds and subscribe to this blog to get our take on all the final events!

 

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12 Aug 2016

#DHSgames Week One – Round Two

In our medal count to wrap up this first week of the #DHSgames, Kazakhstan moves into first place among DHS countries (and 12th overall), with seven total medals including gold in both swimming and weightlifting. Thailand is still going strong in 2nd place in the #DHSgames. Since our August 8th report, Thailand has earned an additional gold and silver, for a cumulative total of four medals, all in weightlifting. In 3rd place is Brazil, host of this year’s games and where the last DHS survey was conducted in 1996. Brazil won a gold and bronze in judo and a silver in 10m Air Pistol.

Clearly, weightlifting is a sport where DHS countries shine. Egypt has also done some heavy lifting. And we don’t just mean the heavy lifting Egypt has accomplished in maternal health, increasing skilled provider assisted births from 35% in 1988 to 92% in 2014.

via GIPHY

Two Egyptian weightlifters won medals this week. On Thursday, trailblazer Sara Ahmed became the first women from an Arab country to win an Olympic medal in any sport when she lifted 255 kg in the women’s 69 kg weightlifting event, taking home the bronze.

Speaking of women’s empowerment, Demographic and Health Surveys include women’s status and empowerment indicators such as literacy, education, employment, and control over earnings. Recent surveys also contain information on women’s participation in household decisions, attitudes toward wife-beating, and hurdles faced by women in accessing health care for themselves. As advances are made in empowering women worldwide, DHS surveys continue to measure progress. Congratulations to Sara Ahmed. This event was generally a big one for DHS countries—Kazakhstan’s Zhazira Zhapparkul took the silver!

In other Egyptian weightlifting news, Mohammed Ihab took home a bronze in the Men’s 77 kg event after he lifted 361 kg. With all this talk about weightlifting, let’s take a moment to talk about weighting in DHS surveys. Like many countries, the population in Egypt is not evenly distributed among governorates. In order to provide representative data at the governorate level for the 2014 Egypt DHS,  sampling weights were used. Reading DHS Tables provides more information about sampling and weighting in the 2014 Egypt DHS. Additionally, the video below provides a great introduction to the principles of DHS Sampling Weights.

You too can participate in the #DHSgames on Twitter and Facebook.  Until our next update on Monday, August 15, be sure to watch DHS countries compete in badminton, fencing, volleyball, field hockey, and handball. Track and field competition starts today, and we’re excited to cheer on the athletes in this piece of the #DHSgames!

08 Aug 2016

#DHSgames Week One – Round One

Here’s the first medal count of the 2016 #DHSgames! Our top three medalists are Thailand, earning one gold and one bronze medal; Vietnam, winning one gold medal; and Kazakhstan, with one silver and one bronze. Thailand, a country whose last DHS survey was in 1987, won two medals in weightlifting events. Vietnam, whose last survey was an AIDS Indicator Survey in 2005, earned its first-ever gold medal in the 10m Air Pistol contest. Athletes in Kazakhstan, a country with two DHS surveys in the 1990s, won silver and bronze medals during judo competitions.

Other #DHSgames medal winners include Uzbekistan, South Africa, Philippines, Indonesia, and Brazil. Among these countries, Philippines released the latest DHS in 2013, though a South Africa DHS is currently ongoing.

Of particular note, the Philippines earned their first-ever medal in women’s weightlifting, which is also their first medal since 1996! In terms of global health success, almost all Filipino households have access to an improved source of drinking water.

In football news: the Brazil women’s national team is dominating the field with 6 points, while the Nigeria men’s national team is leading the way (6) with Mexico (4), Colombia (2), and Brazil (2) not far behind.

Our next medal count will take place August 12. In the meantime, be sure to follow #DHSgames on Twitter and Facebook!

Want to learn more about the #DHSgames? Read here>>

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03 Aug 2016

Get into the Spirit of the 2016 #DHSgames

Click on >> to show the map’s legend.

With the start of the 2016 Summer Olympics, The DHS Program is kicking off its own event of sorts – The DHS Games!

If you have been following us since the summer of 2012, you may recall: The DHS Games are our way of celebrating the countries we work with (90 of which are participating in the actual Olympics). On social media, primarily on Twitter and Facebook, we will be keeping track of these ‘DHS countries,’ bringing attention to those that have completed a DHS survey since the 2012 London Olympics.

We will provide a statistical and global health perspective, as well as report on the competition and athletes themselves – though we will be rooting for everyone!


How can you keep up with The DHS Games, you ask? Make sure you follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and watch out for #DHSgames. We will be talking about this for the entirety of the Olympics, all 17 days!

We hope you observe #DHSgames with us! What teams are you rooting for? What sports are you going to follow? Do you have a favorite athlete? Let us know in the comments or on social media!

13 Jan 2015

Harnessing Technology to Streamline Data Collection

By Guillermo Rojas

The survey process at The DHS Program takes an average of 18-20 months and goes through several steps: survey preparation and questionnaire design, training and fieldwork, data processing, and finally, writing the final report and dissemination. But how do the data get from respondents’ households into the tables you see in the final report?

We employ field interviewers to ask respondents the questions included in the DHS questionnaires – household, woman’s, man’s, and biomarkers. But the way we record their answers changes based on the data collection methodology. At The DHS Program, we employ three types of methodologies to collect data: paper questionnaires, Computer Assisted Field Editing (CAFE), and Computer Assisted Personal Interviews (CAPI).

DHS Model Household Questionnaire, Page 1

DHS Model Household Questionnaire, Page 1

The vast majority of DHS surveys in the past 30 years have used paper questionnaires to collect data. With physical paper questionnaires in hand, field interviewers go from house to house, ask the questions of the respondents, and manually fill out the questionnaires. After interviewers visit all households within a cluster, supervisors ship the questionnaires to the survey central office. Upon arrival, the data processing begins for that particular cluster.

The Computer Assisted Field Editing (CAFE) system allows for editing to happen as interviews are taking place. With CAFE, interviewers still use paper questionnaires, but Field Editors enter the questionnaires into computers while the team is still in the cluster. Essentially, questionnaires are fully field edited by an intelligent data entry program. With this type of data collection approach, Field Editors provide feedback to interviewers on any anomaly identified by the program such as interviewers missing full sections of the questionnaire or wrongly executing critical skip patterns. At this point in the survey process, it is relatively easy to send the interviewer back to the household to resolve any problems. With this approach, there is no need for main data entry as the data entered in the field is sent via the internet to the central office. Therefore, CAFE speeds up the survey process as cluster data files are available as soon as the data arrive to the central office for further processing.

The 2005 Colombia DHS was the first DHS survey to utilize the Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) methodology. CAPI does not involve any type of paper questionnaire—it is entirely digital. Back in 2005, field interviewers used bulky laptops, though nowadays we use lighter tablets and notebook computers.

Fieldwork in the 2005 Colombia DHS

Fieldwork in the 2005 Colombia DHS

The DHS CAPI data collection system consists of three comprehensive subsystems:

1. A system for interviewers to facilitate the interview process

2. A system for supervisors to centralize the data collected by interviewers

3. A system for the central office to monitor the fieldwork operation and to further process the data

The DHS CAPI system uses Bluetooth technology to transfer and share data among members of the same fieldwork team. Supervisors then send data to the central office headquarters using the Internet File Streaming System (IFSS), a cloud-based electronic file delivery system developed by The DHS Program. The primary objective of the service is to deliver files from one user to another in an exceptionally fast and secure way.

In the past 30 years, we’ve witnessed an incredible change in technology, especially with both hardware and software. When I first started at The DHS Program, running the program to impute the woman’s events dates could easily take more than six hours for a survey with a sample size of 2,000 to 3,000 households! Nowadays, with sample sizes of 20,000 to 30,000, this program takes just one to two minutes to run. CAFE and CAPI allow us to use the power of these newer innovations in technology to make sure that we carry out DHS surveys as efficiently and accurately as possible.

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Guillermo Rojas is Chief of Data Processing at The DHS Program. He has more than 35 years of experience in computer science and survey data processing, and has provided data processing technical assistance and training for more than 20 surveys. Since the early stages of The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) program, Mr. Rojas has been involved in the design and development of the data processing methodology currently being used to process and analyze DHS surveys. He is the primary writer of the master programs for implementing the evolving data processing methodology. Mr. Rojas coordinates all DHS data-processing activities and supervises personnel to ensure the accuracy and quality of the processes implemented.

The information provided on this Web site is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

The DHS Program, ICF
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Tel: +1 (301) 407-6500 • Fax: +1 (301) 407-6501
dhsprogram.com