Tag Archives: Nigeria

21 Jul 2021

Mapping Unrealized Fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa

Many women in DHS Program countries have fewer children than they desire. Our newest StoryMap explores unrealized fertility in sub-Saharan Africa, based on the recently published analysis Comparing Ideal and Completed Family Size: A Focus on Women in Low- and Middle-income Countries with Unrealized Fertility. Unrealized fertility is most common among women in Western and Central Africa where about 60% of women age 40-49 report that they had fewer children than they would have liked.

The StoryMap and paper also explore sex preference, ideal family size, and subnational variation in unrealized fertility.


Featured image © Roger Tete for PMI/USAID

01 Feb 2021

New Online Course: Health Data Mapping Online Course

The DHS Program is hosting another Health Data Mapping online course on The DHS Program Learning Hub. The 12-week course focuses on the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in public health, specifically using maps for better program and policy decision making. Participants will be introduced to GIS concepts, manage and clean data in Microsoft Excel, and get a hands-on introduction to QGIS, an open-source GIS software package.

This course is for people who:

  • Have little to no GIS experience, but have an interest in learning QGIS and strong data skills.
  • Live and work in a West African country (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo).
  • Have at least an undergraduate degree in public health, demography, statistics, monitoring & evaluation, or a related subject, and basic training in statistics.
  • Currently work for government ministries, development partners, NGOs, or universities in the field of public health.
  • Can understand and communicate in English—the course will be conducted in English and participants will be expected to give presentations in English.
  • Have experience using Excel and have a computer that can run the latest stable release of QGIS.

The Health Data Mapping online course begins April 12 and ends July 3, 2021. Participants can expect to spend two to four hours a week working independently on self-paced lessons and completing assignments. Course facilitators will give feedback on assignments and answer questions on the course discussion forum and during periodic instructor-led virtual sessions.

The Health Data Mapping online course is ideal for those interested in learning about GIS to improve evidence-based decision making. Explore mapmaking and data analysis resources at The DHS Program Spatial Data Repository, STATcompiler, Spatial Analysis Reports, and video tutorials.

Apply now: the deadline is Monday, February 15, 2021.

02 Dec 2020

DHS Program Analysis Updates: Fall 2020

The DHS Program Research and Analysis team has recently published several studies that analyze new DHS data or employ novel approaches to analyze existing DHS data.

Analysis of New Sickle Cell Data

The 2018 Nigeria DHS includes sickle cell genotyping of a subsample of 11,186 children age 6-59 months, the first population-based household survey to do so at a national level. A new Working Paper, Analysis of Sickle Cell Genotypes of Young Children in Nigeria Using the 2018 DHS Survey, finds that the siblings of genotyped children with sickle cell disease are about 2.5 times as likely to have died as the siblings of other genotyped children. The main value of the data is the description of the spatial distribution of the genotypes within Nigeria. The S and C alleles, which result in sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait, or Hemoglobin C trait, are primarily concentrated in states in the South West Zone, including Lagos, and secondarily in the North Central Zone. This information is helpful for estimating the burden of risk and for prioritizing interventions in different areas of Nigeria.

New Insights Into Wealth Inequality Using DHS Wealth Index Data

DHS surveys include a wealth index, a composite measure calculated using easy-to-collect data on a household’s ownership of selected assets. The DHS wealth index categorizes households into five wealth quintiles. In Household Wealth Relative to Community Wealth: Associations with Specific Asset Ownership and Maternal and Child Health Indicators, researchers computed an additional measure of wealth inequality, calculating a mean wealth score for each sampling cluster. Each household was then categorized according to its wealth relative to the average wealth of the community.

In 9 of 10 countries, households that are poor relative to their communities were more likely to use at least one maternal health care (antenatal care and facility delivery) or vaccination service, suggesting that a household that is poor relative to the community is potentially better able to access the services of a relatively wealthy community. Read the analysis brief for this Analytical Study, a user-friendly summary of the methods, key findings, and relevant action steps. Analysis briefs are available for many recent analytical reports from The DHS Program.

New Analysis of DHS Contraceptive Calendar Data

A new web feature highlights a series of publications that put to new use retrospective, longitudinal data from DHS contraceptive calendars. Three working papers were recently published. In Fertility and Family Planning Characteristics of Contraceptive Clusters in Burundi researchers apply sequence and cluster analysis to identify six discrete clusters that characterize women’s dynamic contraceptive and pregnancy behaviors over the previous five years. Factors most consistently associated with cluster membership are the need for family planning, lifetime experience of contraceptive use, marital status, pregnancy experience, and age.

Additionally, two working papers, Associations between Women’s Current Contraceptive Method Decision Making and their Reproductive Calendar Histories in Burundi, and Attributes Associated with Women’s Contraceptive Profiles in Burundi: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interactions with Media and Health Services, further explore two “Family Builder” clusters. Women from the Family Builder 1 cluster had higher relative risks of deciding jointly whether or not to use contraception with their partners or husbands than of not deciding about contraception. Moreover, both “Family Builder” clusters are characterized by the presence and differences in the timing of multiple pregnancies in their calendar histories. Women with high contraceptive knowledge, intentions to use contraception, and well-articulated family size ideals are characteristic of Family Builder 1, while low contraceptive knowledge, no use of contraception, and vague family size preferences are characteristic of Family Builder 2. These results can guide reproductive health programs as they target interventions to the unique subpopulations they seek to serve.

Find all recent analysis publications in our latest newsletter and on The DHS Program website.


Featured image © Jonathan Torgovnik, Getty Images, Images of Empowerment

07 Jul 2020

World Population Day 2020

July 11th is World Population Day. This year’s UNFPA theme, Putting the brakes on COVID-19, is focused on safeguarding the health of women and girls during the pandemic. World Population Day is an opportunity to pause and reflect on how women are uniquely affected by the COVID-19 crisis:

  • Women make up the largest share of frontline health workers, so they are disproportionately exposed to the novel coronavirus.
  • Disrupted supply chains impact women’s access to modern contraceptives, which can result in unintended pregnancies.
  • Staying home to prevent the spread of COVID-19 puts already vulnerable women at a heightened risk of violence. In addition, gender-based violence prevention and protection efforts, social services, and care have been reduced during the pandemic.
  • The pandemic creates additional barriers to people who are pregnant to access antenatal care and safe-delivery services.
  • With the disruption of schools and community-based services, adolescents and young people may struggle to access information and services related to sexual and reproductive health.  

A population pyramid is a great visualization of a country’s distribution of age groups by sex. Take The DHS Program’s #PopPyramid Quiz to test your knowledge of population pyramids from recently published Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and learn more about DHS indicators related to COVID-19 prevention.

Pro tip: Use STATcompiler to explore indicators and find the answers to the population day quiz!

25 Jun 2020

Disseminating DHS Data at the Subnational Level in Nigeria


As health systems and programs are increasingly managed at subnational levels (regions, states, or counties), DHS data are frequently available at smaller geographic units. For instance, the 2018 Nigeria DHS provides estimates at the national level, by urban-rural residence, and for 6 zones and 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT). There is an increased demand for subnational dissemination activities to present DHS survey findings to local stakeholders to encourage data use in program design, evaluation, and research at the local level. To train communicators on survey dissemination to local program managers, The DHS Program developed a ‘Communicating DHS Data at the National and State Levels’ workshop.

The capacity strengthening training was piloted with the 2016 Kenya DHS, the first Kenya DHS survey to collect data at the county level. The workshop was then formalized into a five-day training, different versions of which have now been implemented in Tanzania, Malawi, Myanmar, Mali, Philippines, Uganda, and Haiti.

Staff members of National Population Commission and National Malaria Elimination Programme demonstrate data visualization best practices. © 2019 Annette McFarland, ICF

On November 5, 2019, more than 300 people attended the official launch of the 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) in Abuja. Following the national seminar, The DHS Program Dissemination team trained teams from the survey implementing agencies, the National Population Commission (NPC) and National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP). Participants learned about dissemination, data use, and data visualization best practices and developed data use activities and presentations with state-level data.

From November to December 2019, the NPC and NMEP teams facilitated state-level data use workshops in each of Nigeria’s 36 states and the FCT. The audience included government officials (Governors’ representatives, Deputy Governors, State Public Health Directors), state-level representatives from UNICEF and WHO, traditional leaders, academia, and others. NPC and NMEP officials trained state-level data users on how to read the tables in the 2018 NDHS final report, demonstrated STATcompiler and The DHS Program mobile app, and facilitated locally relevant discussions about using the 2018 NDHS state-level findings to inform evidence-based programs and policies.

During the Jigawa state dissemination workshop, Governor Mohammed Badaru Abubakar of Jigawa state called for action, “this report can also be used for planning purposes in our ministries, departments, boards and parastatals as well as other relevant agencies in Jigawa state.” The Federal Commissioner for NPC in Anambra state, where 53% of ever-married women age 15-49 have experienced physical, sexual, or emotional spousal violence, said that the 2018 NDHS would be used for “proper planning for sustainable development.”

More than 5,000 people attended dissemination workshops facilitated by NPC and NMEP teams in all 36 states and the FCT.

Thanks to the hard work of the NPC and NMEP dissemination teams, more than 5,000 people attended dissemination workshops in their states and learned the 2018 NDHS findings first-hand.

In Borno state, in North Eastern Nigeria, Dr. Aliyu Kwaya Bura, Commissioner of Health, represented by State Public Health Director, Dr. Lawi Auta Mshelia, pledged full implementation and use of the 2018 NDHS report to deliver quality health services to the people.

See here for the latest update on The DHS Program fieldwork activities during COVID-19.


Featured image: Dissemination training participants from the National Population Commission (NPC) and National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP). © ICF

29 Apr 2020

World Immunization Week 2020

World Immunization Week is observed annually in the last week of April (April 24-30, 2020), to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Already, nearly 20 million children in the world are unvaccinated and under-vaccinated. Now, COVID-19 is disrupting the delivery of routine vaccines in low- and middle-income countries. This year’s theme for World Immunization Week, #VaccinesWork for All, highlights the heroes who develop, deliver, and receive vaccines to protect the health of everyone, everywhere.

The DHS Program has collected immunization data for over 30 years and has dozens of vaccination indicators available for 90+ countries on STATcompiler. Use STATcompiler to explore a map of basic vaccination coverage among children age 12-23 months in 47 countries. Or explore vaccination rates by background characteristics, such as wealth quintile.

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 aims to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. Coverage of the diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine (the percent of children age 12-23 months who have received the third dose of the vaccine) is one DHS survey indicator that tracks countries’ progress towards achieving SDG 3. Learn about coverage of the DPT 3 vaccination and all eight basic vaccinations from five recent DHS surveys in the infographic below.

Share this infographic on Facebook and Twitter, and don’t forget to tag #VaccinesWork to engage with others in this global conversation!

Featured image: Courtesy of the World Health Organization

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