Tag Archives: analysis

04 May 2021

The DHS Program at the 2021 PAA Annual Meeting

May 5th marks the first day of the 2021 Population Association of America (PAA) Annual Meeting. The premier conference of demographers and social and health scientists from the United States and abroad, this year’s PAA Annual Meeting is virtual. You must register to access sessions of the 2021 PAA Annual Meeting.

Over the next four days, demographers and public health professionals will present research, view and comment on posters, and network with peers. For those attending the PAA Annual Meeting, DHS Program staff will be presenting their findings using DHS data. Find the schedule below:

Wednesday, May 5, 2021Time*Type & Number
Trends and the Relationship between Maternal Health and Empowerment in Pakistan, 2012-2018
Lindsay Mallick, Rabia Zafar, Christina Juan, Johanna Useem
1:00pm-2:15pmSession 45
Thursday, May 6, 2021Time*Type & Number
Stunting and Anemia for Children in Urban Poor Environments
Shireen Assaf, Christina Juan
9:30-11:00amPoster 3-103
Trajectories Into Contraceptive Use Among Adolescents in Burundi, Colombia, and Nepal
Kerry L.D. MacQuarrie
10:45am-12:00pmSession 114
Gender- and Sexuality-Based Violence
Discussant: Dr. Sunita Kishor, Director, The DHS Program
1:00-2:15pmSession 134
Friday, May 7, 2021Time*Type & Number
Intention to Use Contraceptives in Jordan: Further Analysis of the Jordan Population and Family Health Survey 2017-18
Sara Riese
9:30-11:00amPoster 6-66
Disability Status and the Experience of Unintended Pregnancy in 5 Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Kerry L.D. MacQuarri
e, Julia Fleuret
1:30-3:00pmPoster 7-48
Contraceptive Use, Method Mix, and Method Availability: A Multilevel Analysis
Lindsay Mallick, Shireen Assaf, Michelle Weinberger, Gbaike Ajayi
2:30-3:45pmSession 238
*All times listed are in Central Daylight Time

Use web and mobile tools from The DHS Program to explore DHS survey data for yourself:


Featured image © rexandpan, stock.adobe.com

31 Mar 2021

Reflections from the 2020 DHS Fellows Program

The DHS Fellows Program builds the long-term institutional capacity of universities in DHS countries to train students and faculty to analyze DHS data. Since 2011, the DHS Fellows Program has trained more than 150 researchers from over 40 universities in 25 countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Typically, Fellows attend two separate in-person workshops, prepare publication-quality research papers in teams using DHS datasets, and implement capacity strengthening activities at their home universities.

For the 2020 DHS Fellows Program, a cohort of university faculty from Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Guinea, Jordan, and Pakistan convened for the first workshop in Nairobi, Kenya, in February 2020. The second workshop, scheduled to begin in April 2020, was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The DHS Program worked quickly to convert the second workshop into online activities. A remote teaching space was created on The DHS Program Learning Hub with presentations and assignments for the Fellows to complete. Virtual meetings were held with each Fellows team to discuss drafts of their working papers.

The 2020 DHS Fellows produced working papers that addressed a variety of research topics including:

As of this blog’s publication, the teams from Jordan and Cameroon have published their working papers in peer-reviewed journals. Visit The DHS Program Fellows page to see all DHS Fellows’ working papers and publications in peer-reviewed journals.

We interviewed teams of 2020 Fellows from the Asian University for Women in Bangladesh and the Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry in Guinea about the virtual DHS capacity strengthening activities conducted for faculty and students.

Bangladesh

For their working paper, Nazmul Alam, Mohammad Manir Hossain Mollah, and Sharin Shajahan Naomi wrote about the prevalence and determinants of adolescent fertility. They conducted two virtual capacity strengthening sessions via Zoom, one for 21 faculty members, researchers, and development practitioners, and another session for 25 students. In the sessions, the Fellows introduced participants to The DHS Program, reviewed basic characteristics of DHS data, and highlighted how one can effectively generate new ideas from available DHS data without needing to conduct field research, which has become difficult during the COVID-19 pandemic. “Although we were a bit hesitant about the outcome of online sessions, they appeared to be beneficial…faculty members from social sciences, public health, and natural sciences joined…after the workshop, we got very positive feedback.”

Mohammad Manir Hossain Mollah, Sharin Shajahan Naomi, and Nazmul Alam, 2020 DHS Fellows from the Asian University for Women. “We believed that we could deliver the outcome despite the challenges of the pandemic due to our teamwork and mutual understanding.”

Guinea

Bienvenu Salim Camara, Sidikiba Sidibé, and Nafissatou Dioubate wrote about non-use of contraceptives among married women. Days before their planned capacity strengthening presentations, Guinea declared a health emergency due to COVID-19. Universities were closed and gatherings of more than 20 people were prohibited, so the Fellows recorded video presentations introducing The DHS Program survey questionnaires and datasets and uploaded them to Google drive. Students watched the videos at their own pace and emailed the Fellows with questions. Now some students are using DHS data in their research. “One of my students is currently working on his Master’s thesis in maternal health using DHS data, and I am supporting him in the data analysis,” explains Camara. Dioubate notes, “I am proud that I was able to pass on the knowledge gained from the DHS Fellows Program to others and show the opportunities that DHS data can offer.”

Sidikiba Sidibé, Nafissatou Dioubate, and Bienvenu Salim Camara, 2020 DHS Fellows from the Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry. “My favorite part was the capacity building in DHS database analysis. This allowed me to undertake other analyses on nutrition indicators using Guinea datasets (food practices for infants and young children) as well as capacity building activities for my students,” notes Sidibé.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the DHS Fellows Program was suspended for 2021. In the meantime, take open courses available on The DHS Program Learning Hub and watch for upcoming Workshop and Training Announcements.

02 Dec 2020

DHS Program Analysis Updates: Fall 2020

The DHS Program Research and Analysis team has recently published several studies that analyze new DHS data or employ novel approaches to analyze existing DHS data.

Analysis of New Sickle Cell Data

The 2018 Nigeria DHS includes sickle cell genotyping of a subsample of 11,186 children age 6-59 months, the first population-based household survey to do so at a national level. A new Working Paper, Analysis of Sickle Cell Genotypes of Young Children in Nigeria Using the 2018 DHS Survey, finds that the siblings of genotyped children with sickle cell disease are about 2.5 times as likely to have died as the siblings of other genotyped children. The main value of the data is the description of the spatial distribution of the genotypes within Nigeria. The S and C alleles, which result in sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait, or Hemoglobin C trait, are primarily concentrated in states in the South West Zone, including Lagos, and secondarily in the North Central Zone. This information is helpful for estimating the burden of risk and for prioritizing interventions in different areas of Nigeria.

New Insights Into Wealth Inequality Using DHS Wealth Index Data

DHS surveys include a wealth index, a composite measure calculated using easy-to-collect data on a household’s ownership of selected assets. The DHS wealth index categorizes households into five wealth quintiles. In Household Wealth Relative to Community Wealth: Associations with Specific Asset Ownership and Maternal and Child Health Indicators, researchers computed an additional measure of wealth inequality, calculating a mean wealth score for each sampling cluster. Each household was then categorized according to its wealth relative to the average wealth of the community.

In 9 of 10 countries, households that are poor relative to their communities were more likely to use at least one maternal health care (antenatal care and facility delivery) or vaccination service, suggesting that a household that is poor relative to the community is potentially better able to access the services of a relatively wealthy community. Read the analysis brief for this Analytical Study, a user-friendly summary of the methods, key findings, and relevant action steps. Analysis briefs are available for many recent analytical reports from The DHS Program.

New Analysis of DHS Contraceptive Calendar Data

A new web feature highlights a series of publications that put to new use retrospective, longitudinal data from DHS contraceptive calendars. Three working papers were recently published. In Fertility and Family Planning Characteristics of Contraceptive Clusters in Burundi researchers apply sequence and cluster analysis to identify six discrete clusters that characterize women’s dynamic contraceptive and pregnancy behaviors over the previous five years. Factors most consistently associated with cluster membership are the need for family planning, lifetime experience of contraceptive use, marital status, pregnancy experience, and age.

Additionally, two working papers, Associations between Women’s Current Contraceptive Method Decision Making and their Reproductive Calendar Histories in Burundi, and Attributes Associated with Women’s Contraceptive Profiles in Burundi: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interactions with Media and Health Services, further explore two “Family Builder” clusters. Women from the Family Builder 1 cluster had higher relative risks of deciding jointly whether or not to use contraception with their partners or husbands than of not deciding about contraception. Moreover, both “Family Builder” clusters are characterized by the presence and differences in the timing of multiple pregnancies in their calendar histories. Women with high contraceptive knowledge, intentions to use contraception, and well-articulated family size ideals are characteristic of Family Builder 1, while low contraceptive knowledge, no use of contraception, and vague family size preferences are characteristic of Family Builder 2. These results can guide reproductive health programs as they target interventions to the unique subpopulations they seek to serve.

Find all recent analysis publications in our latest newsletter and on The DHS Program website.


Featured image © Jonathan Torgovnik, Getty Images, Images of Empowerment

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