Category Archives: Video

22 Jun 2021

The DHS Program’s Digital Resources

The DHS Program has several digital resources available for free to help data users understand, analyze, visualize, and use DHS survey indicators to support evidence-based decision making.

Click on each icon below to access the digital resource.

DHS Program website
STATcompiler
Mobile App
Application Programming Interface
Spatial Data Repository

DHS Program YouTube channel
User Forum

Code Share Library on GitHub
DHS Program Learning Hub

Have you used any of The DHS Program’s digital resources? Share your feedback with The DHS Program by taking the user survey.

Get an overview of these digital resources and more in the new video The DHS Program’s Digital Resources.

Avez-vous utilisé l’une des ressources numériques du DHS Program ? Partagez vos commentaires avec le DHS Program en répondant à l’enquête d’utilisateurs.

Obtenez un aperçu des ressources numériques disponibles dans la nouvelle vidéo Les ressources numériques du DHS Program, en français.

21 Apr 2021

Learn How to Use The DHS Program’s Code Share Library on GitHub

The DHS Program recently released three YouTube tutorial videos to help DHS data users access The DHS Program’s Code Share Library on GitHub. The Code Share Library was started in 2018 to provide code for producing DHS indicators listed in the Guide to DHS Statistics using statistical software like Stata or SPSS. This year, The DHS Program has begun preparing R code as well. You do not need to create a GitHub account to copy or download any code to produce DHS indicators; it is publicly available for use.

The first video, Overview of The DHS Program’s Code Share Library on GitHub, explains the main components of the Code Share Library, including Stata and SPSS repositories, the indicator list, ReadMe file, and chapter folder contents. In each repository on GitHub, there is an important ReadMe file with instructions for users to read before using the code provided.

The second tutorial video, Preparing to Run The DHS Program’s Shared Code in Stata, demonstrates how to prepare to run code to produce DHS indicators in the statistical software Stata using the model datasets. The model datasets were created strictly for practice and do not represent any country’s actual data. Unlike datasets for specific surveys, users do NOT need to register to download model datasets.

One way to start using the Code Share Library is to download the entire repository on your computer. If any update is made to the code in the future, you will need to download the updated code from the Code Share Library. Another way to run the code is to copy and paste the code for your indicator of interest from GitHub to your own personal do file, without having to download the entire repository.

The third video, Running The DHS Program’s Shared Code on Stata, demonstrates how to run the code in Stata to construct indicator variables and produce tables for the indicators. The tables provide a simple tabulation that follows the standard DHS tabulation plan used for survey final reports.

If you do not understand why an indicator was coded in a specific way, check the Guide to DHS Statistics. If you have further questions, email us at codeshare@dhsprogram.com or post your question on The DHS Program User Forum. Follow The DHS Program on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn for the latest news about code updates (including forthcoming R code), survey dataset releases, and more. Happy coding!

08 May 2018

Reading DHS Tables in 4 Easy Steps

Statistical tables can look intimidating at first glance. That’s why we created this How to Read DHS Tables video tutorial using model datasets. Model datasets are created strictly for practice and do not represent any actual country’s data. Download the full model datasets report tables, and follow along on your own. At the end of the tutorial, we’ll have a few practice questions to test your knowledge.

In just 4 easy steps, you can read any table found in a number of DHS Final Reports. Once you’ve mastered reading DHS tables, test your knowledge with a quiz and comment below on how you did!

Test your knowledge!

Step 1: Read the title and subtitle. They tell you the topic and the specific population group being described.

Step 2: Scan the column headings. The column headings describe how the information is categorized.

Step 3: Scan the row headings. These are found in the first vertical column in the table. They show the different ways the data are divided into categories based on background characteristics.

Step 4: Find the overall percentages. The totals can be found in the row at the bottom of the table.

Think you’re ready to read DHS Final Report tables? Try these practice questions, and comment below on how you did!

Test your knowledge!

If you found this tutorial helpful, let us know in the comments section below. Don’t forget to subscribe to The DHS Program newsletter for updates on our digital tools, surveys, and more!

27 Dec 2017

The Best of DHS 2017

Another year has passed at The DHS Program, and we’re looking back at some of our best moments throughout the year! Just to name a few:

    

  • We introduced the first DHS Program online sampling course.

 Happy New Year from The DHS Program!

Watch the full video here:

15 May 2017

Everything You Need to Know about DHS Data and More

So, you’re new to DHS and you’ve registered as a DHS data user, downloaded the free available datasets, but now what? We have the perfect resources to get you started.

The following videos provide an overview of DHS data answering key questions such as, what is a data file or dataset? What is the difference between De Jure and De Facto? What types of data files are available for download?

Starting with the Introduction to DHS Datasets, this video provides a guide to units of analysis, basic terminology, and DHS data files.

As mentioned in the video above, separate data files are created for different units of analysis. DHS Dataset Types in 60 Seconds runs through the most common data files and what they contain.

De Jure and De Facto are terms that you will see often within DHS reports and datasets. The following video breaks down what the terms mean, and how they apply to analyzing DHS data.

And finally, where is the information about interviewed households and individuals located in different data files? The Introduction to DHS Data Structure examines DHS datasets in a hierarchical structure.

We will have more videos released this summer, but for those who are still eager to learn more about DHS data, check out DHS Dataset Names Explained below.

 

21 Mar 2017

7 Tips to Matching DHS Final Report Tables

Can't match DHS Final Report tables?
Feeling frustrated because you can’t match DHS Final Report tables in your statistical software?

 

Our new four-part video series shows the Top 7 Tips & Tricks for Matching DHS Final Report Tables.

In this four-part video series, we will be covering the top 7 tips and tricks to matching The DHS Program Final Reports using a statistical software program.

The videos will guide you through the following questions:

  1. Are you using the correct data file?
  2. Are you using the correct denominator of cases?
  3. Are you using the correct variable(s)?
  4. Are you properly recoding?
  5. Are you applying the correct weights?
  6. Are you selecting the correct software specific code?
  7. Are you properly coding the tabulation commands in your statistical program?

Watch the four videos in the series below on Matching DHS Final Report tables to get all the details on the top 7 tips and tricks.


Additional help can be found on our website and the User Forum.
10 Feb 2017

Where Statistics are Beautiful

Hans Rosling created a world where “statistics are beautiful” and data are entertaining. The staff at The DHS Program have always believed these things to be true but found it difficult to convince the masses. And then came Gapminder and the juggernaut of Hans Rosling’s charismatic, informative, and perspective-changing data presentations.

The DHS Program was heartbroken to learn of Hans Rosling’s death earlier this week. DHS has enjoyed a long and enthusiastic relationship with Dr. Rosling. In 2009, The DHS Program and USAID had the honor of welcoming Dr. Rosling as our keynote speaker at the DHS 25th anniversary celebration in Washington, DC. What is particularly striking in watching the video again after 8 years, is the laughter. Before Hans Rosling, no one would have believed that a data presentation could be so engaging and witty while being so insightful.

In addition to being entertaining and informative, Dr. Rosling was exceptionally modest and gracious. He came to the DHS 25th anniversary event at his own cost, and credited USAID and DHS data with his own success. He thanked USAID and the US taxpayers saying, “Nothing in my career would have been possible without DHS data.”

But really we, at The DHS Program, owe Hans Rosling a tremendous debt of gratitude. Dr. Rosling was a great advocate not just for DHS data, but for all data. He understood, better than anyone else, that data are worthless unless they are used. And he succeeded in doing what many of us have attempted and failed:  he made data come alive.  He used the data to expose the many incorrect notions about development that even people working in the field have, and he did it with such unique charm and flair. His presentations inspired people to think in different ways and to take action.

To Hans Rosling’s family, we thank you for sharing Hans with the world, and for so willingly joining his mission to “edutain” us. All of us at The DHS Program mourn the loss of this warm, generous visionary. This week, more than ever, we commit to continue the work that Hans has started, and will be inspired by Hans Rosling’s leadership and ingenuity as we look for new ways to provide the world with actionable, understandable data.

21 Dec 2016

Video: Best of DHS 2016

Take a look back at the highlights of The DHS Program from 2016…

The DHS Program welcomed several new staff members:


via GIPHY

The 2014 Lesotho DHS final report was released using a new final report format:


via GIPHY

Faster data, including the model datasets and bulk downloading of datasets using a download manager:


via GIPHY

French STATcompiler and Mobile App:


via GIPHY

Surveys, surveys, surveys:


via GIPHY

9 Regional Capacity Strengthening Workshops:


via GIPHY

And The DHS Program produced more than 80 publications:


via GIPHY

We hope you continue to follow us throughout 2017!

Watch the full video below:

 

29 Jun 2016

Strengthening Afghanistan’s Health Sector: Evidence from the 2015 Afghanistan DHS

Dr. Ferozuddin Feroz (left), Sayed Alam Shinwari, Micheal Kugelman, and Larry Sample at The Wilson Center's Event, "A Good Diagnosis for Afghanistan: Strengthening the Health Sector"

Dr. Ferozuddin Feroz (left), Sayed Alam Shinwari, Michael Kugelman, and Larry Sampler at The Wilson Center’s Event, “A Good Diagnosis for Afghanistan: Strengthening the Health Sector”

Working in collaboration, two Afghan government organizations– the Central Statistics Organization and the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) – conducted Afghanistan’s first Demographic and Health Survey (AfDHS). “This in itself is an enormous milestone,” said Larry Sampler, Assistant to the Administrator for the Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan Affairs at USAID during a panel discussion at the Wilson Center, “A Good Diagnosis for Afghanistan: Strengthening the Health Sector.” Sampler, joined by the Afghanistan Minister of Public Health, Dr. Ferozuddin Feroz; Sayed Alam Shinwari, President of the Afghan Medical Professionals Association of America; and Michael Kugelman, Senior Associate for South Asia at The Wilson Center highlighted the implications of the Afghan government’s efforts to improve maternal and child health as demonstrated in the newly released 2015 AfDHS Key Indicators Report (KIR).

AfDHS-KIROf particular interest to both the MOPH and USAID, AfDHS results show progress in reducing childhood mortalityCurrently, about 1 in 20 children does not survive until their 5th birthday in Afghanistan. The majority of these childhood deaths occur during the first year of life. Compared to earlier time periods, both infant and under-five mortality have declined, suggesting that child health interventions are making a difference. Dr. Feroz explains, “The DHS survey shows that there is substantial improvement in maternal health and child health. This progress has been made through high-level commitments, a productive work environment with development partners as well as non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and local NGOs, scaling up of cost effective and lifesaving interventions across the country, training of midwives, as well as attention to equity and those living in remote areas.”

“The DHS survey demonstrates how far the Afghan public health sector has come and also how far it has to go,” stated Larry Sampler. What are the challenges of Afghanistan’s health sector? “Afghanistan still faces instability and insecurity, poverty, unemployment, the few number of midwives or health staff across the country,” explains Dr. Feroz. But in spite of these challenges, the Afghan MOPH is developing a national strategy for the next five years. “We will use this recent survey as a baseline to measure progress – to increase access to remote areas, improve the quality of services, introduce cost-effective interventions, and focus on equity issues.”

Dr. Fred Arnold of The DHS Program with Dr. Ferozuddin Feroz, Afghanistan Minister of Public Health

Dr. Fred Arnold (left)  of The DHS Program with Dr. Ferozuddin Feroz, Afghanistan Minister of Public Health

The survey covered topics including fertility and family planning, maternal and child health, childhood and maternal mortality, nutrition, malaria, HIV knowledge, and other health issues. The KIR is a short report of key indicators from the 2015 AfDHS that is meant to provide important data in a timely fashion to program managers and policy makers. Additional indicators such as the maternal mortality ratio will be included in the AfDHS Final Report, scheduled for release in late 2016.

To learn more about the Woodrow Wilson Center’s event, watch “A Good Diagnosis for Afghanistan: Strengthening the Health Sector” or visit the Wilson Center’s website.

The 2015 Afghanistan Demographic and Health Survey (2015 AfDHS) was implemented by the Central Statistics Organization and the Ministry of Public Health from June 15, 2015, to February 23, 2016. The funding for the AfDHS was provided by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). ICF International provided technical assistance through The DHS Program, a USAID-funded project providing support and technical assistance in the implementation of population and health surveys in countries worldwide.

07 Jan 2016

Video: Best of The DHS Program 2015

Take a look back at the highlights of The DHS Program from 2015…

 

The DHS Program welcomed several new staff members:


via GIPHY

 

We released two helpful tutorial videos on sampling and weighting DHS data:


via GIPHY

 

33 South-to-South consultants from 23 countries played an integral role in capacity strengthening for all aspects of survey planning and implementation:


via GIPHY

 

A new publication was launched, the Key Indicators Report, to provide initial results of a survey:


via GIPHY

 

More than 700,000 biomarker tests were completed, measuring HIV, anemia, malaria, and micronutrients.  11 South-to-South Consultants were trained for biomarker technical assistance:


via GIPHY

 

We unveiled Beta STATcompiler and v2.0 of The DHS Program mobile app:


via GIPHY

 

The Gambia released its first-ever DHS:


via GIPHY

 

Users can now download citations for analytical, comparative, and trend reports:


via GIPHY

 

And The DHS Program produced over 100 publications:


via GIPHY

 

We hope you continue to follow us throughout 2016!

Watch the full video below:

The information provided on this Web site is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

The DHS Program, ICF
530 Gaither Road, Suite 500, Rockville, MD 20850
Tel: +1 (301) 407-6500 • Fax: +1 (301) 407-6501
dhsprogram.com