Category Archives: Capacity Strengthening

25 Jun 2020

Disseminating DHS Data at the Subnational Level in Nigeria


As health systems and programs are increasingly managed at subnational levels (regions, states, or counties), DHS data are frequently available at smaller geographic units. For instance, the 2018 Nigeria DHS provides estimates at the national level, by urban-rural residence, and for 6 zones and 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT). There is an increased demand for subnational dissemination activities to present DHS survey findings to local stakeholders to encourage data use in program design, evaluation, and research at the local level. To train communicators on survey dissemination to local program managers, The DHS Program developed a ‘Communicating DHS Data at the National and State Levels’ workshop.

The capacity strengthening training was piloted with the 2016 Kenya DHS, the first Kenya DHS survey to collect data at the county level. The workshop was then formalized into a five-day training, different versions of which have now been implemented in Tanzania, Malawi, Myanmar, Mali, Philippines, Uganda, and Haiti.

Staff members of National Population Commission and National Malaria Elimination Programme demonstrate data visualization best practices. © 2019 Annette McFarland, ICF

On November 5, 2019, more than 300 people attended the official launch of the 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) in Abuja. Following the national seminar, The DHS Program Dissemination team trained teams from the survey implementing agencies, the National Population Commission (NPC) and National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP). Participants learned about dissemination, data use, and data visualization best practices and developed data use activities and presentations with state-level data.

From November to December 2019, the NPC and NMEP teams facilitated state-level data use workshops in each of Nigeria’s 36 states and the FCT. The audience included government officials (Governors’ representatives, Deputy Governors, State Public Health Directors), state-level representatives from UNICEF and WHO, traditional leaders, academia, and others. NPC and NMEP officials trained state-level data users on how to read the tables in the 2018 NDHS final report, demonstrated STATcompiler and The DHS Program mobile app, and facilitated locally relevant discussions about using the 2018 NDHS state-level findings to inform evidence-based programs and policies.

During the Jigawa state dissemination workshop, Governor Mohammed Badaru Abubakar of Jigawa state called for action, “this report can also be used for planning purposes in our ministries, departments, boards and parastatals as well as other relevant agencies in Jigawa state.” The Federal Commissioner for NPC in Anambra state, where 53% of ever-married women age 15-49 have experienced physical, sexual, or emotional spousal violence, said that the 2018 NDHS would be used for “proper planning for sustainable development.”

More than 5,000 people attended dissemination workshops facilitated by NPC and NMEP teams in all 36 states and the FCT.

Thanks to the hard work of the NPC and NMEP dissemination teams, more than 5,000 people attended dissemination workshops in their states and learned the 2018 NDHS findings first-hand.

In Borno state, in North Eastern Nigeria, Dr. Aliyu Kwaya Bura, Commissioner of Health, represented by State Public Health Director, Dr. Lawi Auta Mshelia, pledged full implementation and use of the 2018 NDHS report to deliver quality health services to the people.

See here for the latest update on The DHS Program fieldwork activities during COVID-19.


Featured image: Dissemination training participants from the National Population Commission (NPC) and National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP). © ICF

22 Apr 2020

New on the Learning Hub: Interpreting Malaria Trends eLearning Course

In honor of World Malaria Day, The DHS Program introduces a new open-access online course, Interpreting Trends in Malaria Indicators. The course is available on The DHS Program’s new online learning platform, the Learning Hub.

Based on an in-person Malaria Indicator Trends Workshop developed by The DHS Program in 2017, this free, self-guided course takes 2-3 hours to complete. This course is designed for malaria data users, such as professionals from National Malarial Control Programs, Ministries of Health, implementing and collaborating agencies, donor agencies, and anyone who works in malaria programming or is interested in malaria data.

The purpose of this course is to increase the capacity of participants to understand and interpret trends in malaria indicators from population-based household surveys to answer key malaria programmatic questions.

In Interpreting Trends in Malaria Indicators, participants will learn:

  • Sampling and weighting techniques used by The DHS Program
  • How sampling errors are displayed in DHS final reports
  • To accurately interpret a malaria case study for programmatic decision making
  • To generate graphics of malaria trends using Excel

To take this course, create an account on The DHS Program Learning Hub. It’s free; just choose a username and password. Then register for the course and start learning!

This new course on malaria trends complements existing malaria resources offered by The DHS Program, including another free, self-guided course, Measuring Malaria through Household Surveys, available on the Global Health eLearning Center platform in English and French. Measuring Malaria takes 2-3 hours to complete and provides an overview of key malaria indicators collected through household surveys. Since Measuring Malaria covers data collection, calculation, and interpretation of key malaria indicators, taking it first can lay a strong foundation before taking Interpreting Trends in Malaria Indicators.

For World Malaria Day, explore malaria indicators using The DHS Program’s malaria mini-tool and read the newly revised Malaria Indicator Survey questionnaires. Or use STATcompiler to visualize key malaria indicators globally such as household ownership and use of insecticide-treated nets.

Featured image: © ICF

17 Apr 2020

Introducing The DHS Program Learning Hub

As the world responds to the COVID-19 outbreak, The DHS Program remains committed to promoting the use of DHS data. As many DHS data users transition to distance teaching and learning, do not forget about existing capacity strengthening resources available through The DHS Program to close statistical skills gaps.


The DHS Program is pleased to announce The DHS Program Learning Hub, a virtual learning and collaboration space, at learning.dhsprogram.com. The Learning Hub offers a solution to make learning opportunities more widely available with online courses, either standalone or as part of The DHS Program workshops.

What types of courses are found on the Learning Hub?

All courses on the Learning Hub are asynchronous, meaning learners engage on their own time, from any time zone. Course formats vary.

Self-guided: Anyone can enroll in these open-access online courses, which can be taken any time, at your own pace. Currently, The DHS Program is offering Interpreting Trends in Malaria Indicators as a self-guided course. Learn about Malaria Indicator Surveys, key malaria indicators, and how to interpret trends in data to answer malaria programmatic questions. This course takes 2-3 hours to complete. Just create an account on the Learning Hub, enroll in the course, and start learning!

Blended: All DHS Program regional workshops (such as Data Mapping and Data Processing Procedures) have both online and in-person components in tailored combinations. Participants complete pre-work assignments online before meeting in-person for a capacity strengthening workshop. This helps ensure that all participants have the same foundation and are equally ready to maximize their time together in-person. The DHS Fellows Program is another example of a blended course. For all DHS Program workshops, participants go through a rigorous application process.

The 2020 DHS Fellows completed online assignments before an in-person workshop in Kenya, February/March 2020. They will continue collaborating virtually throughout the year. © ICF

Instructor-led: These courses are 100% online, time-bound, and led by an instructor, usually a staff member of The DHS Program, who is available to assist participants and answer their questions. Learners must apply to instructor-led courses, as space is limited. Applications are reviewed by The DHS Program staff to ensure course participants have the required knowledge and skills. A proportion of applicants are formally accepted to the course. The Survey Sampling Training Course, for instance, equips participants with the knowledge, tools, skills, and abilities to design samples for population surveys, such as DHS surveys. Participants in the Survey Sampling course spend an average of 5-10 hours a week for 8 weeks engaging with modules, completing coursework, and interacting with their peers and instructor(s) in a discussion forum. The call for applications for the first Survey Sampling Training Course to be offered en français will be available soon.

All courses on The DHS Program Learning Hub include interactive modules, videos, and links to further reading and useful resources. Courses and associated resources remain available to participants even after they complete the course or the course ends.

More courses on different topics related to household surveys are in development now. Check The DHS Program’s capacity strengthening page and the Learning Hub for announcements regarding upcoming courses and calls for applications.

Follow The DHS Program on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn for updates on capacity strengthening opportunities and more!


Featured image caption: © ICF

25 Feb 2020

Inside The DHS Program: Q&A with Gisèle Dunia

Name: Gisèle Dunia

Position title: Senior Advisor for Capacity Strengthening

Languages spoken: French, English, Swahili, Lingala, and Haitian Creole

When did you start at The DHS Program? March 2019

Favorite DHS survey cover: I prefer it when we have an image that represents the country. For example, the report for the 2007 Democratic Republic of the Congo DHS had an okapi on the cover, and you find okapis only in DRC.

2007 DRC DHS Final Report

What is your role at The DHS Program? As the Senior Advisor for Capacity Strengthening, I oversee the implementation of strategies to strengthen host country individual and institutional capacity, working with different technical teams.

My work involves assessing survey implementing agencies’ capacity at the beginning and at the end of a survey and working on capacity strengthening activities to improve and sustain institutional capacity. Capacity strengthening activities are either survey-related or competency-based trainings. Our training opportunities are offered both online, on The DHS Program Learning Hub, and in-person during national and regional workshops.

Another way of strengthening capacity at the country level is by collaborating with consultants. The DHS Program has been using south-to-south consultants for several years. Consultants help build and reinforce capacity in host countries and across regions. Under DHS-8, we are designing a certification program for these consultants, streamlining processes to equip them with skills to better support survey implementation and dissemination.

What work are you most proud of? I have designed and facilitated several capacity strengthening activities in the past. In my work now at The DHS Program, I’m no longer in front of people facilitating trainings. I am mostly behind the scenes. I am very much involved in the design process, making sure that we have the right tools to facilitate engaging trainings. I am proud of the way I’ve been able to help technical teams design trainings, and I trust them to successfully run the show.

I am most proud of completely designing the DHS-8 Global Capacity Strengthening Strategy within my first six months at a program that has so many components as The DHS Program.

What’s your favorite trip to date? So far, my second trip is my favorite one. In December, I went to Madagascar to conduct a capacity assessment of the Institut National de la Statistique (INSTAT), the implementing agency for the forthcoming fifth Madagascar Demographic and Health Survey. While there I pilot-tested our updated Capacity Assessment Tools, which I used to assess INSTAT’s current capacity. Based on the results, I shared with INSTAT a list of capacity strengthening activities that I think would benefit them, like how they can restructure the way they work so that whatever capacity is built during the DHS survey process can be managed and shared throughout INSTAT to build long-term institutional capacity.

For more information about The DHS Program’s capacity strengthening approaches, visit our website.

Featured Image: © 2019 ICF

20 Nov 2019

From Participant to Facilitator: DHS Fellows from Myanmar and Egypt

The 2020 DHS Fellows Program is currently accepting applications from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Jordan, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Tajikistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Guinea, Mali, Rwanda, Senegal, and Zambia. Apply to join us for the DHS Fellows Program in 2020. The deadline to apply is November 24, 2019.

 

In this blog post, we interview two DHS Fellows who served as DHS Program workshop facilitators.

Dr. Kyaw Swa Mya is an Associate Professor and Head of Department of Biostatistics and Medical Demography at the University of Public Health, Yangon, Myanmar and Mr. Ehab Sakr is an assistant lecturer in the department of Demography and Bio-statistics at the Faculty of Graduate Studies for Statistical Research in Cairo University in Egypt. Both Fellows were both co-facilitators for the DHS Fellows Program (2019 and 2018, respectively) in addition to co-facilitating other DHS Program capacity strengthening workshops.

When was your first experience with the DHS Fellows Program?

KSM: In 2018, I was selected as part of a three-member team for the 2018 DHS Fellows Program from the University of Public Health, Yangon. We were the first Fellows from Myanmar where only one DHS survey has been conducted in 2015-2016. In Myanmar, most public health professionals, including myself, were not aware of DHS surveys.

ES: In January 2017, my colleagues and I were selected to be the first Egyptian team to participate in the 2017 DHS Fellows Program. I was eager for this opportunity because I used DHS data in my studies when I specialized in demography 17 years ago.

What was your experience as a DHS Fellows Program participant?

KSM: The Fellows Program provided many opportunities for the participants. First, we learned how DHS data was systematically collected and prepared for data users. Second, the Fellows Program improved our data management and analytical skills using STATA, as well as report writing skills. Third, as a requirement of the Fellows Program, we conducted capacity building activities at our University. These activities raised awareness among the Myanmar government and NGO public health professionals about using DHS data and DHS resources during planning, implementation, and evaluation of their health programs. We also disseminated the findings to stakeholders who impact policy implementation. Finally, we produced a DHS working paper that was published in the PLOS One journal.

ES: The Fellows Program was a great opportunity to enhance my knowledge about survey tools and improve my skills to use DHS data more efficiently and effectively. We were exposed to different cultures and academic trends from five other teams around the world. It’s also worth mentioning that implementing the capacity building project at our home university enriched my technical, teaching, and coaching skills. In two workshops facilitated by Dr. Wenjuan Wang and Dr. Shireen Assaf, we learned to use DHS data tools and techniques when analyzing DHS data. My teammates, Prof. Emeritus Mona Khalifa and Dr. Wafaa Hussein, and I wrote a DHS working paper titled “Changes in Contraceptive Use Dynamics in Egypt: Analysis of the 2008 and 2014 Demographic and Health Surveys.”

What was your experience as a facilitator?

KSM: The DHS Program gave me a second opportunity to participate in the DHS Fellows Program as a co-facilitator. I am thankful to The DHS Program for this opportunity. It was quite a challenging experience to be a co-facilitator. As a Fellow, I only needed to focus on my research topic, but as co-facilitator, I needed to learn all the research topics of participating countries. Moreover, I had to prepare lecture topics and this helped me become more familiar and confident with DHS methodology, analytical skills, and interpretation of the results.

ES: July 2019 was another great moment when I was asked to co-facilitate a workshop in Jordan on producing report tables using SPSS syntax at the Department of Statistics. It was a great experience communicating with lovely and skilled trainees, and we adapted to situations that forced us to customize the agenda of the workshop to suit the skills and knowledge of the trainees.

What impact has the DHS Fellows Program made on you?

KSM: The DHS Fellows Program changed my career, and DHS data has become a core part of my life. Since 2018, I published two journal articles and presented two oral presentations at the 10th and 11th International Conference on Public Health among Greater Mekong Sub-Regional Countries. One of my Masters in Public Health (MPH) students received a degree and I reviewed two master theses of two junior colleagues using DHS data and they achieved their master’s degree from foreign countries. I also received some emails from different countries asking for help with DHS coding and analysis challenges, and I helped them as far as I could. In addition, three of my MPH students prepared their proposals using DHS data this year. Myanmar is now realizing the data quality and accuracy of DHS indicators, so, not only academicians and students but also program managers and policymakers are using DHS indicators in relevant situations.

The DHS Fellow Program is one of the best and most effective programs that I have ever attended. I am grateful to USAID for providing financial and technical support to collect and disseminate quality data to monitor and evaluate population, health, and nutrition programs for developing countries.

ES: The DHS Fellows Program was life-changing and it gave me the opportunity to deepen my scientific and practical knowledge in an international, inspiring, creative, and diversified environment. Special thanks to USAID, The DHS Program team, and all the people I mentioned above. I learned a lot from them and hope to continue collaborating with them in the future.


Photo caption: Facilitators and participants from the 2018 DHS Fellows Data Analysis Workshop. ©ICF


Written by: Kyaw Swa Mya and Ehab Sakr

Dr. Kyaw Swa Mya is a Biostatistician. He is an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Biostatistics and Medical Demography, University of Public Health, Yangon, Myanmar. He holds a master’s degree in Public Health in Biostatistics. He is a member of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Public Health, Yangon. He currently works as a module supervisor of Diploma in Research Methodology and Research Ethics program conducted in the University of Medicine (I). His research interests are maternal and child health, nutrition, and non-communicable diseases.

Mr. Ehab Sakr is an assistant lecturer in the department of Demography and Bio-statistics, Faculty of Graduate Studies for Statistical Research, Cairo University in Egypt. He holds a master’s degree in Statistics from the Faculty of Economics and Political Science. His thesis theme was related to the levels and trends of age at first marriage for women in Egypt. He taught and consulted on various topics related to population dynamics and development and is currently a Ph.D. student.

06 Nov 2019

Reflections from the 2019 DHS Fellows Program: Senegal

The 2020 DHS Fellows Program is currently accepting applications from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Jordan, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Tajikistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Guinea, Mali, Rwanda, Senegal, and Zambia. The deadline to apply is November 24th.

 

The DHS Fellows Program was an opportunity for us to analyze DHS data, and we are particularly fortunate to live in Senegal, which released the Senegal Continuous Survey, providing nationally representative data annually between 2012 and 2018.

Prior to the Fellows Program we used DHS reports and results without knowing the methodology, data collection, analysis, and reporting work that was behind it. The possibility of using the data for secondary analysis was also unknown to us. The DHS Fellows Program allowed us to master the DHS survey structure, sampling design, and understand how to analyze population-based survey data using Stata software. The Fellows Program was a learning process, but it was also an opportunity for culture-sharing with other participants from diverse backgrounds such as Ghana, Ethiopia, Myanmar, Indonesia, and Afghanistan. Each group has advised the others in their work so everyone can present the best possible results. The co-facilitators of the Fellows program were former DHS Fellows and this gave us an opportunity to see Fellows alumni presenting their experiences with the program.

Click to view the 2019 DHS Fellows Facebook photo album

Thanks to the Fellows Program, we are better equipped to use this data again in other future work and have shared it with our colleagues during our capacity building activities. Some colleagues are already hoping to participate in future Fellows Program or other DHS workshops. This program not only allowed us to better understand the DHS surveys, but also make in-depth statistical analyses and to use DHS data to write analysis reports.

Download the DHS Working Paper authored by the Senegalese DHS Fellows participants, Coverage and Associated Factors for HIV Screening in Senegal: Further Analysis of the 2017 Demographic and Health Survey.

We were one of the first Francophone teams to participate in the Fellows Program, which initially caused us some apprehension.  The call for applications required a skilled level of English as the course is taught in English, but thanks to the availability of our facilitators, Shireen, Wenjuan, and co-facilitators, Kyaw and Gedefaw, we did very well!

We could never thank ICF and The DHS Program enough for this amazing experience. In addition, we formed a real family with teams from other countries. We strongly recommend that researchers from French-speaking countries submit their applications for the 2020 DHS Fellows Program.

 

Featured photo caption: Dr. Khardiata Diallo Mbaye, Prof. Cheikh Tidiane Ndour, and Dr. Ndeye Aïssatou Lakhe at the 2019 DHS Fellows Report Writing Workshop. ©ICF


Written by: Ndeye Aïssatou Lakhe, Prof. Cheikh Tidiane Ndour, and Dr. Khardiata Diallo Mbaye

Dr. Ndeye Aïssatou Lakhe is a medical doctor specializing in infectious and tropical diseases. She currently works as a lecturer in infectious diseases at the Faculty of Medicine of Dakar. She is also a practicing MD at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases at Fann Teaching Hospital, the third largest hospital in Dakar. She is the head of the Infection and Prevention Control (IPC) committee of the hospital. Her interests are in policy making, particularly in IPC and health program evaluation.

Prof. Cheikh Tidiane Ndour is a Professor of infectious and tropical diseases, working in the Department of Diseases at the Fann University Hospital and the Faculty of Medicine at the Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar. He has been the head of the AIDS and STI Control Division of the Ministry of Health for the last three years. His current focus is the implementation of innovative strategies to achieve the 90-90-90 strategy: identify 90% of people infected by HIV, put 90% of identified HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral treatment, and ensure that 90% of those on ART have undetectable viral loads, in accordance with commitments to the international community.

Dr . Khardiata Diallo Mbaye specializes in Infectious and tropical diseases. She works as a teacher/researcher at the University Cheikh Anta DIOP at the Faculty of Medicine of Dakar, and as a physician at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases at Fann Teaching Hospital. She also specializes in public health.

22 Oct 2019

Journey Mapping Methods: Results from a Study on Place of Delivery

Data from the World Health Organization (WHO) estimate that, globally, 289,000 women of reproductive age die of maternal causes each year. Over 80% of these deaths are due to complications during childbirth and the postpartum period. Skilled birth attendance at health facilities equipped to handle complications is crucial for ensuring maternal survival. While Kenya has made progress in improving maternal health services in the last decade, data from the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey show that less than two-thirds of births are delivered in a health facility.

The DHS Program recently published a study on place of delivery and shared the results with county stakeholders and USAID project implementers at dissemination events in Kisumu, Turkana, Nakuru, and Nairobi counties. One aim of the study was to explore the “why” questions that sometimes are left unanswered with indicator estimates and other quantitative analysis; specifically: Why do women in Kenya deliver at home, even in instances when health facilities appear to be available?

Click photos to enlarge.

Exploring this research question included the use of journey mapping methods. In particular, the data collection tools were designed with the aim of mapping the journey for Kenyan women from the time when they learn they are pregnant to when and where they give birth.

A journey mapping approach recognizes that often a journey does not follow a straight line; instead, a journey—from pregnancy to delivery in this case—includes many economic, familial, and sociocultural factors that must be navigated along the way. In addition, the focus on mapping journeys works to uncover the story related to a woman’s delivery experience.

Data from the study suggest that place of delivery is not as simple as grouping women into the dichotomy of those who choose to deliver in a health facility and those who choose to deliver outside a health facility. Numerous factors influence place of delivery, and women do not necessarily always choose the place of delivery. The study’s conclusions recognize that contextual factors and decision making pertaining to place of delivery are complex. The pregnancy-to-delivery continuum follows an ever-shifting terrain influenced by myriad individual and collective beliefs, perceptions, tensions, and experiences.

Key Conclusions: Understanding the Nuances of a Women’s Journey along the Pregnancy-to-Delivery Continuum

  • Decision making occurs over time
  • Limited options for services to address fears and insecurities
  • Gendered views regarding male partner involvement in health care
  • Geographic and transportation challenges
  • Free maternity care is not always free
  • Expectation of support and respectful maternal care not always met
  • Prominence of and preferences for traditional birth attendant (TBA)
  • Challenges negotiating decisions and power dynamics in a marriage or partnership
  • Hesitancy of health facilities to accommodate for traditional practice
  • Potential reliance on financial support from male partners

The conclusions from this study represent a platform to galvanize momentum and facilitate a commitment to take positive steps forward. Past and present strategies and programs put into operation by USAID/Kenya, the Government of Kenya, and their partners have made substantial progress in improving the uptake of optimal maternal and child health practices. Research studies such as this one—and the use of journey mapping methods—can make a valuable contribution to knowledge about both the context in which women experience pregnancy and delivery and the specific challenges they face along the pregnancy-to-delivery continuum.

Download the full study, “Place of Delivery: Perceptions, Tensions, and Experiences. Results from a Study in Baringo, Kisumu, Migori, Samburu, and Turkana Counties, Kenya” on The DHS Program website.


Photo gallery captions (left to right):

  1. Participants at the Kisumu County dissemination and data use workshop, August 1, 2019. © ICF
  2. Participants at the Turkana County dissemination and data use workshop, August 5, 2019. © ICF
  3. Participants at the Nakuru County dissemination and data use workshop, July 29, 2019. © ICF
  4. Participants at the Nairobi dissemination and data use workshop, July 17, 2019. The group included Nairobi-based stakeholders as well as key stakeholders who traveled to Nairobi from Baringo, Kisumu, Migori, Nakuru, Samburu, and Turkana counties. © ICF
19 Aug 2019

DHS Data Users: Samuel Oppong, Ghana National Malaria Control Programme

If you are interested in being featured in the ‘DHS Data Users’ blog series, let us know here by submitting your example of DHS Program data use. 


How are you involved in DHS Program surveys and analysis workshops?

My first time working on a DHS Program survey was for the 2016 Ghana Malaria Indicator Survey (GMIS). I helped with fieldwork monitoring and report writing. After the 2016 GMIS, I participated in the 2017 Regional DHS/MIS Malaria Analysis Workshop. At this workshop, I worked with my team members from the Ghana National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) to write an abstract, “Factors Influencing Malaria Prevalence in Children Under 5,” using the 2016 GMIS data.

Samuel Oppong (left) with participants from Ghana at
the 2017 DHS/MIS Malaria Analysis Workshop. © ICF

I then transitioned from being a workshop participant to a workshop co-facilitator, facilitating the 2017 Regional Malaria Indicator Trends Workshop in Uganda. This workshop brought together NMCP monitoring and evaluation (M&E) program managers from Liberia, Malawi, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda to examine trends in malaria indicators.

More recently, I co-facilitated the 2018 Ghana Malaria Trends Workshop. This workshop brought together district malaria health officers to analyze trends in household survey indicators in Ghana. This was a great workshop because I was able to work with the data I am most familiar with! The output from this workshop is published on The DHS Program website.

Samuel Oppong (left) and Annē Linn co-facilitated the 2018
Ghana Malaria Indicator Trends Workshop. © ICF

How has NMCP used DHS data for programmatic decision making?

After the release of the 2016 GMIS, NMCP noticed a low uptake of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACTs) in the Northern region, but the use of SP/Fansidar was high, which is not a recommended treatment for malaria in children. This triggered us to do additional research to figure out what was going on in this region and investigate which outlets were distributing SP. We realized that people were not receiving SP from public health facilities but from private clinical shops and other drug peddlers. The 2016 GMIS results provided a snapshot of the malaria case management situation in the Northern region and provided us justification to explore further. To solve this problem, NMCP implemented a sensitization activity to ensure people in the region know the recommended treatment and sources to get the correct treatment.

Another example of evidence-based decision making was the implementation of a malaria sensitization campaign using data the 2016 GMIS. Malaria prevalence by microscopy in the Eastern region increased between the 2014 GDHS and 2016 GMIS. This was a worrying trend because in Ghana we normally only see high malaria prevalence in the Northern and Upper West regions. NMCP looked more critically at the 2016 GMIS results and saw that while insecticide-treated net (ITN) ownership was high, the proportion of people who recognized the cause and symptoms of malaria was very low. As a result, NMCP implemented a community level sensitization activity in four districts of the Eastern region.

How do you use MIS survey data during your daily job?

I recently collaborated on a research paper using DHS data. The paper, published in The Malaria Journal, used survey data from the 2014 GDHS and the 2016 GMIS to examine ITN use behavior by exploring how several household and environmental variables related to use among Ghanaians with access to an ITN. This further analysis paper has been extremely helpful for programmatic decision making here at NMCP.

What data are you looking forward to in the upcoming 2019 GMIS?

I am interested in further examining the information about the type of nets in households. NMCP finished a mass long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) distribution campaign in 2018 and implemented a school-based piperonyl butoxide (PBO) net distribution campaign in 2019. The 2019 GMIS results will provide information on the reach and use of these nets across Ghana as well as where people obtained their nets.


Written by: Samuel Oppong

Samuel Oppong is a Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist with the Ghana National Malaria Control Programme. He coordinators M&E activities in vector control interventions, routine data quality audits, and SMC. He is involved in capacity building of national, regional, district and health facility staff on capturing, reporting, and analyzing malaria-related data from routine health information systems as well as other malaria data sources. He also leads capacity building programs of national, regional, and district staff on conducting data quality audits as well as onsite training, supportive supervision (OTSS) on malaria data management.

11 Jun 2018

New e-Learning Course: Measuring Malaria through Household Surveys

The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) recently reoriented their communication strategy around insecticide-treated nets or ITNs, moving from a focus on behavior change around ITN use to a focus on net care and repair to extend the life of existing ITNs. Why the change?

The 2013-14 DRC Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) showed that only 50% of the household population had slept under an ITN the night before the survey, an indicator they wanted to improve. But when they dove deeper into ITN use, interpreting it in the context of ITN access, a different picture emerged. The survey also found that 47% of the population had access to an ITN. Interpreting these two indicators together, the NMCP redefined their strategy with the understanding that people were using the ITNs they had, and since use was higher than access, more than two people were using each net. In this context, the behavior change messages needed to be targeted toward helping people extend the life of their ITNs.

This kind of data use is only successful when decision makers understand the indicators that are informing their policies and programs. Our new course on K4Health’s Global Health eLearning (GHeL) Center, Measuring Malaria through Household Surveys, dives into the major malaria indicators, guiding learners through the process of collecting and calculating these indicators and through considerations for their interpretation.

Click here to take the course

The DHS Program has continuously sought to develop tools and curricula to strengthen the capacity of stakeholders to use survey data. From the survey report and dataset to STATcompiler and the mobile app, from tutorial videos to the user forum, and from one-day Data to Action workshops to advanced data analysis workshops, we are always innovating to meet users’ needs.

Last year, The DHS Program developed a Malaria Indicator Trends workshop curriculum to increase the capacity of data users from National Malaria Control Programs to utilize DHS/MIS data to answer key programmatic questions and to accurately interpret trends in malaria indicators. The workshop targets users who needed more information than could be provided in a one-day dissemination workshop but who do not have (or need) the skills to analyze with STATA. It was immediately clear that this workshop, which dives into each of the recommended indicators, their calculation, their limitations, and considerations for their interpretation, was meeting a need for data users. The next step to increase the well-informed use of these important indicators was to expand the reach of this curriculum through an online course on the Global Health eLearning Center platform.

This free course targets professionals (both generalist staff working on malaria as well as those with programmatic expertise in malaria) from donor agencies, ministries of health, and implementing and collaborating agencies. It takes 2-3 hours to complete and can be taken as a part of the Monitoring & Evaluation or Infectious Diseases certificates offered through the GHeL center.

When the indicators from household surveys are better understood, better programmatic decisions will be made.

Click here to take the course

Photo Credit: © 2016 Sarah Hoibak/VectorWorks, Courtesy of Photoshare

11 Apr 2018

Learn how to Sample like a DHS Statistician

Many projects provide statistical training, but what makes The DHS Program’s capacity strengthening program unique is its ability to use state-of-the-art training approaches. Building on past workshops, eLearning tools, and well-received feedback, we are pleased to announce the release of a new DHS Survey Sampling eLearning course designed for broader public consumption.

In order to meet the overwhelming demand for sampling trainings, the first DHS Survey Sampling eLearning course was designed and conducted from June 19 to September 30, 2017, with a total of 32 participants from 16 countries completing the course. Participants were affiliated with various institutions such as National Statistics Offices, National Malaria Control Programs, National Center for HIV/AIDS Programs, universities, and non-governmental organizations.

Registration for the 2018 DHS Survey Sampling eLearning course is now open and applications will be accepted through April 20, 2018. This 8-week course begins May 1 and ends June 29, 2018. Prior knowledge of DHS surveys is beneficial, but not essential. However, all participants should have demonstrable basic statistical knowledge and computer skills in Excel prior to the training. Participants must be able to understand and communicate in English.

The eLearning course equips participants with the knowledge, tools, and abilities to design samples for population surveys, such as DHS surveys. While DHS surveys are the focus of the course, the acquired skills can also be used for other types of surveys. Participants can virtually participate in the course at their own pace within the 8-week timeframe from anywhere in the world.

The eLearning course also includes a discussion forum to promote participant interaction and peer-to-peer learning. Participants will share reflections on the learned course content and get feedback from facilitators. At the completion of the course, participants will still be able to access the course and resources at any time.

Apply for the 2018 DHS Survey Sampling eLearning course today!

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Let us know if you have any questions about the eLearning course in the comments section below. Don’t forget to subscribe to The DHS Program newsletter for updates on our digital tools, surveys, and more!

Photo captions: Screenshots of the eLearning course


Written by: Abibata Handley &  Mahmoud Elkasabi

Ms. Handley has more than 17 years of experience in designing and implementing training and capacity-building activities to support programs providing assistance in less developed settings. She has extensive knowledge of adult learning theories, including participatory methods, and has planned and/or conducted training activities using eLearning and online tools. As the Capacity Building and Trainer Advisor at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), Ms. Handley was responsible for supporting the development and implementation of a comprehensive capacity-strengthening program for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Health Services (SIAPS) program. Ms. Handley has experience in working on capacity strengthening and training programs in Burkina Faso, Kenya, Uganda, and Rwanda. Ms. Handley has an M.A. in International Development and Intercultural Training.

Dr. Elkasabi is a Sampling Statistician at The DHS Program. He joined The DHS Program in 2013 after earning his Ph.D. in Survey Methodology from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, with a specialty in Survey Statistics and Sampling. Dr. Elkasabi is responsible for the sampling design for the DHS surveys as well as building sampling capacity in many countries, such as Ghana, Egypt, Nigeria, India, Malawi, Zambia, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan. Dr. Elkasabi likes to work closely with the sampling statisticians in different countries. In these win-win relationships, he shares his knowledge in sampling and gains new knowledge & experiences.

The information provided on this Web site is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

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