Category Archives: Implementing Agencies

16 Dec 2015

Engaging with DHS Data in Senegal

Days like today are why I love my job. “Thematic data use workshops are the most important part of the survey,” Fatou CAMARA, director of the Senegal Continuous Survey at l’Agence Nationale de la Statistique et la Démographie (ANSD), tells me over dinner. “They’re also my favorite,” she adds. I couldn’t agree more. It’s always rewarding to watch people engage directly with data from The DHS Program surveys, but even more so when it’s the women and men who manage a country’s health programs.

Representatives from ANSD, the Ministry of Health and Social Action, and USAID officially open the thematic workshop.

Representatives from ANSD, the Ministry of Health and Social Action, and USAID officially open the thematic workshop.

The topics for the thematic workshop are maternal health, child health, and nutrition. Regional medical coordinators, reproductive health coordinators, and nutrition supervisors have come from all 14 of Senegal’s regions to participate. They are joined by the national maternal health, child survival, and nutrition program directors.

Senegal DHS and SPA Report CoversThe morning is packed with introductions and presentations on the relevant results from the Senegal Continuous Survey. Data is collected each year in Senegal and the results are designed to guide program planning, monitoring, and evaluation. The Senegal Continuous Survey has two parts: 1) the Continuous DHS, which collects data on households, women, men, and children; and 2) the Continuous SPA, which collects data on health facilities, health care providers, and clients receiving health care.

Participants review the dissemination materials for the Continuous Survey.

Participants review the dissemination materials for the Continuous Survey.

Questions and comments during the discussion following the presentations are intriguing. “We trained our health care providers on the integrated management of childhood illness, but the [survey] results show that they aren’t putting this into practice during sick child consultations.” “Almost a quarter of births still occur at home instead of health facilities, though the availability of delivery services is high. We need to increase our communication efforts with women.” Continuous SPA coordinator, Dr Ibou GUISSE, and the director of field operations for the Continuous DHS, Mabeye DIOP, do an excellent job of providing detailed answers and explanations.

The afternoon begins with an activity on how to read and understand tables from the Continuous Survey. Participants are guided step-by-step, from reading the title and subtitle to finding the totals in the table. Over lunch, a participant tells me that the activity is useful, “Previously, I sometimes struggled to make sense of the tables. Now I’m more confident.”

Participants identify priority actions from their regional strategic plans during group work.

Participants identify priority actions from their regional strategic plans during group work.

The rest of the day is dedicated to group work. Each region must identify two priority actions from their regional strategic health plans that will be completed in the six months after the workshop. They must also indicate specific results from the Continuous Survey that support the actions they have chosen. Finally, they must create an action plan for these priority actions, including next steps and deadlines. The groups are so engrossed in the group work that they continue well past 6 PM. Tomorrow, they will present their priority actions, supporting data, and action plans. I can hardly wait see to see the data in action!

28 Oct 2015

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: Cambodia

Names: Phan Chinda, They Kheam, and Chhay Satia of the National Institute of Statistics/Ministry of Planning; Sok Kosal, Loun Mondol, and Lam Phirun of the Directorate General for Health/Ministry of Health; and Sarah Balian of The DHS Program

Country of origin: Cambodia

When not working, favorite place to visit:

Lom Phirun: Washington, DC.

What has been the nicest surprise visiting The DHS Program HQ?

Chhay Satia: It’s a nice place with friendly people.

What do you miss most about home when you are here?

Loun Mondol: Food and family.

2014 Cambodia DHSWhat is your favorite DHS final report cover?
All: 2014 Cambodia DHS with Angkor Wat Temple.

Favorite DHS chapter or indicator, and why?
Sok Kosal: Domestic violence, because it’s a new chapter for Cambodia and it specifies the different experiences of violence.

Lam Phirun: Maternal and child mortality, fertility rate, need for family planning, maternal health, and child health because all topics are related to my work/program.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about? Why?

Sok Kosal: Child health is an important issue because it alerts us to take attention on child immunizations and illnesses.

Chhay Satia: I believe domestic violence is an important issue for Cambodian culture as it’s not right to treat women badly.

They Kheam: Abortion at home, because this could be caused by a mother or woman’s health problems.

Phan Chinda: Child mortality is a key topic because it is very important for Cambodia’s strategy and policy.

Loun Mondol: Maternal mortality as well as nutritional status for women and children are important indicators because maternal and child health is still a priority issue in my country.

How do you hope the DHS data from your country will be used?

Sok Kosal: Cambodia DHS data should be used for program management and policy formation,  especially monitoring and evaluation of Cambodia’s 2015 Millennium Development Goals.

What have you learned from the DHS experience?

Loun Mondol: How to search for information and data on the DHS website, tools, maps, and the user forum.

06 May 2015

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: The Gambia

(L-R) Gambian visitors Saikou Trawally, Alieu Saho, Momodou L. Cham  & DHS staff member Zhuzhi Moore at The  DHS Program Headquarters

(L-R) Gambian visitors Saikou Trawally, Alieu Saho, Momodou L. Cham & DHS Program staff member Zhuzhi Moore at The  DHS Program Headquarters in Rockville, MD

Name(s):  Saikou Trawally, Alieu Saho, and Momodou L. Cham

Country of origin:  The Gambia

Position titles and organizations:  Officials of The Gambia Bureau of Statistics and National Population Commission Secretariat

When not working, favorite place to visit:  Shopping sites, relatives and friends, and site seeing cultural centers.

First time you worked with The DHS Program’s data:

Momodou: I first used the Data in 2001 for my MSC. Medical Demography Dissertation at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Diseases, University of London.

What has been the nicest surprise visiting The DHS Program headquarters? 

The infrastructure, expertise of staff, the wonderful reception, and the knowledge sharing.

What do you miss most about home when you are here? Family

What is the biggest difference between The DHS Program headquarters office and your office at home?

Reliable communication facilities, furniture, the office space and environment.

2013 Gambia DHS

2013 The Gambia DHS

What is your favorite DHS final report cover?  2013 The Gambia DHS cover with a green background with flora and fauna in the middle of the page.

Favorite DHS chapter or indicator, and why?

Mortality (infant, child, and maternal mortality) and HIV/AIDS. This is the first time we are getting accurate data on these indicators. The data will help The Gambia know the level of progress towards addressing such issues.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?

Reproductive health is important because the health of the mother determines the health of the newborn.

How do you hope the DHS data from your country will be used?  

The data should be used for planning, monitoring, and informing national policies on health and population.

What have you learned from the DHS experience?

We have learned a lot about survey design, sampling, data collection and processing, analysis, and producing a standard technical report that is internationally comparable.

09 Oct 2014

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: DRC

Congolese visitors at DHS Headquarters

Congolese visitors at DHS Headquarters

In May 2014, The DHS Program welcomed visitors from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). This post is one in a series of interviews with visitors to DHS headquarters. Don’t read French? You can use the translate feature at the top of the page!

Nom : HABIMANA Joseph , KASHONGWE Newali Jean Paul, MAKAYA M Mbenza Simon, MUKUNDA Munandi Jeba, SEBINWA Jean François

Pays d’origine : République Démocratique du Congo

Titre et organisation :

HABIMANA : Coordinateur Médical EDS RDC II 2013, Chargé du Partenariat Externe au Ministère de la Santé Publique (12 Direction)

KASHONGWE : Coordonnateur Médical Adjoint EDS-RDC II Biologie Programme National de Lutte Contre le SIDA/RDC

MAKAYA : Consultant ICF International

MUKUNDA : Directeur Technique/ EDS RDC II

SEBINWA : Project EDS RDC II

Quand vous ne travaillez pas, quel est l’endroit  où vous préférez aller :

HABIMANA : Quand je ne travaille pas, soit je suis à la maison, soit que je vais voir mes nièces et leurs familles respectives. Mais pas souvent.

KASHONGWE : Au terrain de basketball, bibliothèque, cyber café

MAKAYA : Quand je ne travaille pas au bureau, je préfère aller à la campagne dans ma ferme

Chez vous, où a-t-on le plus de chances de vous trouver le samedi ?

HABIMANA : Le samedi et le dimanche il est plus facile de me trouver à la maison. Je me repose le weekend.

MAKAYA : C’est à la ferme qu’on a le plus de chance de me trouver le samedi

Racontez un peu de la première fois que vous avez travaillé sur des données du «The DHS Program»:

HABIMANA : Les données du programme DHS ont donné des résultats positifs et le DHS est un programme qui reflète la réalité du terrain.

KASHONGWE : C’est en 2007, dans la gestion des échantillons

SEBINWA : Avant mon recrutement j’ai étudié en profondeur le rapport du 1er EDS pour préparer mon interview

Qu’est-ce qui vous a le plus agréablement surpris lors de votre séjour au «The DHS Program»?

KASHONGWE : L’organisation, la disponibilité des collaborateurs, le calme dans le travail, l’accueil

MAKAYA : C’est  l’accueil cordial réservé à l’équipe lors de sa présentation de bureau en bureau au personnel du programme DHS

SEBINWA : La jovialité des personnes

Qu’est-ce qui vous manque le plus quand vous êtes ici ?

MAKAYA : C’est la possibilité de se déplacer et de visiter la ville à souhait.

MUKUNDA : En général, tout va bien à part l’atmosphère familiale qui me manque après les heures de service.

Quelle est la plus grande différence entre le bureau du «The DHS Program» et votre bureau dans votre pays ?

KASHONGWE : La climatisation, plus confortable, c’est plus adapté au travail

SEBINWA : La fonctionnalité et le confort

2013-14 DRC DHS Final Report

2013-14 DRC DHS Final Report

Quelle est votre  page de couverture préférée ?

Tout le monde : Ma page de couverture préférée est l’okapi qui n’existe qu’en RDC

Quel est votre chapitre ou indicateur préféré, et pourquoi ? 

HABIMANA : Chapitre sur la nutrition sur lequel j’ai travaillé qui montre l’état chronique de la malnutrition des enfants en RDC.

KASHONGWE : Le VIH/Sida parce qu’il est précis et détaillé par province

MUKUNDA : Chapitre planification familiale car il vous permet de bien planifier les naissances

SEBINWA : La baisse de la mortalité infantile : l’indicateur est porteur d’espoir pour l’avenir

Quel est le problème de population ou de santé qui vous intéresse le plus, et pourquoi ?

MAKAYA : Le problème de population qui m’intéresse le plus est celui relatif à l’urbanisation parce que une répartition spatiale de la population mal maitrisé est un frein important au développement.

MUKUNDA : Le problème de santé des enfants et de la mère car le développement du pays dépend de ressources humains qu’il regorge

Comment espérez-vous que les données de l’EDS sur votre pays seront utilisées ?

HABIMANA : Nous espérons que le pays va sensibiliser les différents domaines traités par l’EDS, mobiliser les ressources et agir sur les points présentant les indicateurs faible et améliorer davantage tous les indicateurs positifs.

KASHONGWE : Par la dissémination, par les ateliers, des publications, leur utilisation dans recherches scientifiques

MUKUNDA : Après diffusion des résultats, ces données servent le gouvernement et les partenaires à revoir les projets et programmes de développement

SEBINWA : Compte tenu des attentes des acteurs, j’espère que les données seront exploitées au maximum

Qu’avez–vous appris en travaillant avec «The DHS Program »?

HABIMANA : Nous avons beaucoup appris sur l’EDS, l’élaboration des questionnaires qui ont touché presque tous les domaines de la santé et de la population, le traitement des données et l’interdépendance de tous ces éléments. Le DHS est une autre façon de connaitre le milieu dans lequel on vit.

KASHONGWE : Tous les aspects de planification, de formation, de rapports, d’estimation, de déploiement de matériel médical pour l’activité sur les biomarqueurs

MAKAYA : Tous les chiffres des rapports doivent être vérifiés.

MUKUNDA : Avec le programme DHS, j’ai appris beaucoup de choses notamment le renforcement des capacités dans la planification des enquêtes, de la collecte, traitement des données et la rédaction des rapports (préliminaire et final).

09 Sep 2014

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: Niger

In September 2013, The DHS Program welcomed visitors from Niger. This is the fifth in a series of interviews with visitors to DHS headquarters. Don’t read French? You can use the translate feature at the top of the page!

Nom:

MODIELI AMADOU Djibrilla, NOMAOU Abdou, OUMAROU Sani, JOHOA Méaki, Radjikou HASSANE

Pays d’origine:

NIGER

Organisations:

Institut National de la Statistique  (INS) et Coordination Intersectorielle de Lutte contre les IST/VIH/SIDA

Quand vous ne travaillez pas, quel est l’endroit  où vous préférez aller: 

NOMAOU : Les magasins et les restaurants à côté de notre hôtel.

HASSANE : Magasins, Centres historiques (Washington)

La première fois que vous avez travaillée sur des données du “The DHS Program:

MODIELI J’ai eu à faire plusieurs études approfondies à partir des données de DHS ; j’ai surtout travaillé avec DHS 2006 sur mon mémoire de démographie.

Qu’est-ce qui vous a le plus agréablement surpris lors de votre séjour au programme DHS? 

NOMAOU: Le fait qui m’a le plus surpris est l’organisation du travail pour finaliser le rapport et les différents documents (Affiche, Note de synthèse, le dépliant)

OUMAROU: Une bonne organisation de travail, chacun sait ce qu’il doit faire.

Qu’est-ce qui vous manque le plus quand vous êtes ici?
OUMAROU & HASSANE: Ma famille.

JOHOA: La convivialité familiale

2012 Burundi MIS

2012 Burundi MIS

Quelle est la plus grande différence entre le bureau du “The DHS Program” et votre bureau dans votre pays?

NOMAOU: Ce n’est pas à comparer. ICF International est une grande entreprise alors l’INS Niger est une structure de l’Etat.

JOHOA: Le calme, café et amuse-gueule pour tout le monde.

Quelle est votre page de couverture préférée?  

MODIELI: J’ai pas pu prendre connaissance des pages de couverture de tous les pays, mais parmi celle que j’ai consultées celle du Burundi me parait bien.

2012 NIger DHS

2012 NIger DHS

HASSANE: Celle que nous avons choisie pour le Niger

Quel est votre chapitre ou indicateur préféré, et pourquoi?

NOMAOU: Mon chapitre préféré est celui  relatif à la nutrition des enfants de moins de cinq ans parce que la malnutrition est l’une des causes de mortalité infantile.

OUMAROU: Le chapitre sur la mortalité des enfants de moins de cinq ans parce qu’à partir de ce chapitre, on voit les progrès accomplis par notre pays en matière de santé des enfants.

JOHOA: Santé de l’enfant, si enfant malade rien ne va.

Quel est le problème de population ou de santé qui vous intéresse le plus, et pourquoi?

MODIELI: Le paludisme car c’est la première cause de morbidité chez les enfants de moins de 5 ans au Niger.

OUMAROU: C’est le niveau de fécondité des femmes qui est stagnent depuis la première EDSN1992. Il va falloir mener une étude sur les déterminants de cette fécondité, mais aussi sur la baisse de la mortalité des enfants de moins de cinq ans qui sont d’ailleurs deux phénomènes liés.

HASSANE: Planification familiale, VIH/SIDA, Accouchement en milieu hospitalier, amélioration de la couverture sanitaire

Comment espérez-vous que les données de l’EDS sur votre pays seront utilisées ?

OUMAROU :  J’espère qu’elles vont être utilisées par ceux qui devraient le faire à savoir le pouvoir public, la société civile, les étudiants et chercheurs ainsi que les journalistes qui auront la tâche de bien expliquer le niveau des principaux indicateurs.

JOHOA : Les données de DHS seront utilisées par les autorités administratives, les organismes internationaux, les ONGs, les étudiants …(biens préssés d’avoir les résultats définitifs).

HASSANE : Les responsables des différents programmes vont faire une analyse de la situation (voir le niveau des indicateurs, dégager des priorités et programmer des actions puis chercher des financements auprès des partenaires.)

Qu’avez–vous appris en travaillant avec “The DHS Program“?

MODIELI : La maîtrise de la structure des questionnaires, et surtout la familiarisation avec les variables utilisées.

NOMAOU : Travailler avec ICF international permet de mettre en place une bonne organisation du travail sur le terrain et surtout de collecter des bonnes informations ce qui conduira au calcul des indicateurs de qualité.

OUMAROU : Beaucoup de choses. En tant que Directeur Technique pendant l’EDSN-MICS 2006 et l’EDSN-MICS 2012, j’ai appris la rigueur qui entoure le processus de réalisation de cette enquête, de l’échantillonnage jusqu’à la dissémination des résultats. C’est une bonne expérience dans la carrière d’un statisticien démographe.

06 Aug 2014

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: Mali

Malian visitors at DHS Headquarters

Malian visitors at DHS Headquarters

In May 2014, The DHS Program welcomed visitors from Mali. This is the fourth in a series of interviews with visitors to DHS headquarters. Don’t read French? You can use the translate feature at the top of the page!

Nom :

Traoré SEYDOU, Institut National de la Statistique

Keita SAMBA, Chef unité statistique, Ministère santé hygiène publique

Sidibe SIDI, Directeur adjoint cellule de la planification et de statistique secteur santé

Zima DIALLO, Chef de département de la recherche de la normalisation et des enquêtes statistiques, INSTAT

Pays d’origine :

Mali

Quand vous ne travaillez pas, quel est l’endroit  où vous préférez aller :

SAMBA : Promenade

SIDI : visiter la ville de Washington

DIALLO: Hôtel, supermarché, balade de parc

Chez vous, où a-t-on le plus de chances de vous trouver le samedi ?

SIDI :Au service pour finaliser les dossiers

DIALLO : Au bureau (samedi), église et maison (dimanche)

Qu’est-ce qui vous a le plus agréablement surpris lors de votre séjour au programme DHS ?

SEYDOU : L’organisation et la répartition des tâches au niveau d’ICF

SAMBA : Répartition des tâches et assiduité du personnel

Qu’est-ce qui vous manque le plus quand vous êtes ici ?

SIDI : Ma famille

Quelle est la plus grande différence entre le bureau du programme DHS et votre bureau dans votre pays ?

SIDI : Organisation du travail

DIALLO : La spécialisation de chaque cadre dans son domaine et la disponibilité y afférente.

2012-2013 Mali DHS Final Report

2012-2013 Mali DHS Final Report

Quelle est votre  page de couverture préférée ?

SAMBA : Celle adoptée par notre pays

SIDI : Couverture avec la tête de gazelle qui représente l’excellence

Quel est votre chapitre ou indicateur préféré, et pourquoi ? 

DIALLO : Allaitement, état nutritionnel et disponibilité alimentaire

Quel est le problème de population ou de santé qui vous

2006 Mali DHS Final Report

2006 Mali DHS Final Report

intéresse le plus, et pourquoi ?

SEYDOU : Mortalité des enfants puisque un problème de population sérieux au Mali

SAMBA : La pauvreté monétaire et les soins de santé

Comment espérez-vous que les données de l’EDS sur votre pays seront utilisées ?

SAMBA : Pour la mise en œuvre des politiques de santé et de précision dans les efforts à faire et les résultats à atteindre

DIALLO : Suivi et meilleur exécution des programmes de santé publique.

Qu’avez–vous appris en travaillant avec le programme DHS ?

SAMBA: Le respect du délai et le sérieux dans l’accomplissement de la tâche.

SIDI : Comment bien finaliser un rapport

15 Jun 2014

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: Nigeria

Inuwa Bakari Jalingo & Amaka Loveth

Inuwa Bakari Jalingo & Amaka Loveth

In March 2014, The DHS Program welcomed visitors from Nigeria. This is the third in a series of interviews with visitors to DHS headquarters.

Name(s):

Inuwa Bakari Jalingo (Project Coordinator, Nigeria DHS) and Ezenwa Nwamaka “Amaka” Loveth   (Project Director, 2013 NDHS,  Deputy Director, National Population Commission, Nigeria).

Country of origin:  

Nigeria

2013 Nigeria DHS

2013 Nigeria DHS

When not working, favorite place to visit:

Inuwa: The farm

Amaka: The market

Where would we find you on a Saturday?

Inuwa: In Jalingo at the farm, in Abuja at home or at work.

Amaka: At home.

First time you worked with DHS data:

Inuwa: 1999

Amaka: 2003

What do you miss most about home when you are here?  

Inuwa: I miss my family.

Amaka: I miss my family, the warm weather in my country, and sometimes my favorite dishes.

What is your favorite DHS final report cover?

2008 Nigeria DHS

2008 Nigeria DHS

Inuwa: The 2008 Nigeria DHS. I also like  the Pakistan cover.

Amaka: I like the 2013 Nigeria DHS cover.

Favorite DHS chapter or indicator, and why?

Inuwa: Infant mortality –Children are not supposed to die, rather they should live to their full potentials. I want to see that indicator drop in my country to 1 digit.

2012-13 Pakistan DHS

2012-13 Pakistan DHS

Amaka: Child Health, because of my love for children.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about?  Why?

Inuwa: Maternal/Child Care– I want to see women giving safe births and children survive the first 5 years after birth.

Amaka: Maternal health, because I have lost many relations and some friends due to complications during child birth.

How do you hope the DHS data from your country will be used?  

Inuwa: To re-strategize programs  and projects  and formulate policies that will improve the quality of life and standard of living among Nigerians.

Amaka: to be used by the government to improve programming for a better life for its citizens.

What have you learned from the DHS experience?

Inuwa: I have learned professionalism and specialization, since staff specialized in  specific areas  and views are respected.

Amaka: it has built my capacity generally.

09 May 2014

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: Jordan

Ikhlas Aranki and Ahmad Abu Haidar.

Ikhlas Aranki and Ahmad Abu Haidar.

In October 2013, The DHS Program welcomed visitors from the Jordan Department of Statistics. This is the second in a series of interviews with visitors to DHS headquarters. Find the first post here.

Names:

Ikhlas Aranki (Assistant Director General, Department of Statistics) and Ahmad Abu Haidar (Social Statistics and Poverty Studies Advisor, Department of Statistics).

When not working, favorite place to visit:

Restaurants, shopping centers, and parks.

First time you worked with The DHS Program’s data:

Ikhlas: 1990

Ahmad: 2012

What has been the nicest surprise visiting The DHS Program headquarters? 

Meeting old friends.

2012 Jordan DHS

2012 Jordan DHS

What do you miss most about home when you are here?

We miss family.

What is your favorite DHS final report cover?

All covers from Jordanian DHS reports.

FavoriteDHS chapter or indicator, and why?

Domestic Violence and Early Childhood development, because these chapters focus on marginalized segments of the population.

How do you hope theDHS data from your country will be used?

  • Planning for health programs and evaluating and improving existing programs as well as analyzing trends in demographic parameters.
  • Shaping health related policy through providing decision information useful for informed policy choices.
01 Apr 2014

Spotlight on Implementing Agencies: Indonesia

Atmarita, Krismawati, and Rina Herartri (Pictured, L to R) visited DHS Headquarters from Indonesia.

Atmarita, Krismawati, and Rina Herartri (L to R)

In June 2013, The DHS Program welcomed visitors from Indonesia’s Ministry of Health, Population and Family Planning Board and Bureau of Population Statistics. This is the first in a series of interviews with visitors toDHS headquarters.

Names:

Atmarita(Head of Division for Public Health Services, Center for Public Health Intervention Technology, National Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health), Rina Herartri (Researcher, National Population and Family Planning Board), andKrismawati (Head of Subdirectorate of Wage and Income, BPS-Statistics, Indonesia)

When not working, favorite place to visit:

Atmarita: Papua, Indonesia and Annapolis, Maryland

First time you worked withDHS data:

Atmarita: I used the 1991IDHS data for my dissertation.

Rina: 1997.

Krismawati: 2002. 

What has been the nicest surprise visitingDHS headquarters?

Rina: It’s like a little UN and very nice people.

IDHS Cover 2012

IDHS 2012

What do you miss most about home when you are here?

Atmarita: Mickey, my dog.

Rina: nasi goreng (fried rice) for breakfast.

Krismawati: my children.

What is the biggest difference between theDHS headquarters office and your office at home?

Rina: Tight security and an endless supply of coffee.

IDHS 2012 Adolescent Reproductive Health Final Report

IDHS 2012 Adolescent Reproductive Health Final Report

What is your favoriteDHS final report cover?

The 2007 IDHS (unanimous!)

FavoriteDHS chapter or indicator, and why?

Atmarita: The most important indicators are TFR [Total Fertility Rate], MMR [Maternal Mortality Ratio] and CPR [Contraceptive Prevalence Rate], because they are important in developing future strategy.

Rina: Fertility and family planning, the most important indicators of the achievements of my organization.

Krismawati: Fertility, as one of the inputs for the policy makers.

What population or health issue are you most passionate about? Why?

Atmarita: Use of contraception, especially among adolescents (age 15-24), because they are the high-risk group for future fertility and maternal health.

Rina: Fertility decision making, how it is affected by so many factors.

Krismawati: Adolescent Reproductive Health.

How do you hope theDHS data from your country will be used?

Atmarita: For evaluating the implementation of current programs and developing new strategy.

Rina and Krismawati: I hope it will be widely used by policy makers and academics as well.

What have you learned from theDHS experience?

Rina: Everything, from designing the survey, writing the reports, and disseminating the results.

The information provided on this Web site is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

The DHS Program, ICF
530 Gaither Road, Suite 500, Rockville, MD 20850
Tel: +1 (301) 407-6500 • Fax: +1 (301) 407-6501
dhsprogram.com