11 Feb 2020

Luminare: Geospatial Modeling for Locally Available Data

This blog post is part of Luminare, our blog series exploring innovative solutions to data collection, quality assurance, biomarker measurement, data use, and further analysis.


Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) collect nationally representative data and data representative at the first subnational administrative level (ADMIN 1). The 2016 Ethiopia DHS was designed to produce representative estimates for nine regions and two administrative cities. The 2014 Kenya DHS produced estimates for eight regions (formerly provinces). In addition to national-level indicators, STATcompiler also presents subnational data, as shown in the map of childhood stunting at the ADMIN 1 level in Ethiopia and Kenya.

Childhood Stunting by Subnational Level, 2016 Ethiopia DHS & 2014 Kenya DHS

Click the map to explore childhood stunting using STATcompiler.

National and ADMIN 1 data help countries track their progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, for instance. However, as countries decentralize their health service delivery systems, local health officials increasingly need local data. In Ethiopia, nine regions are further divided into zones and special districts (ADMIN 2). In Kenya, eight regions are further divided into counties.

One option to get data representative at the ADMIN 2 level is to increase the survey sample size, requiring more time and more money. Another option is to produce spatially interpolated maps, which use Bayesian geospatial modeling techniques to predict indicator values at non-surveyed locations.

The DHS Program’s Geospatial team assembled data for 12 geospatial covariates, such as elevation, precipitation, and population density. These covariates are related to and can partially explain variation in health indicators of interest, allowing for more accurate predictions across the map.

Next, the Geospatial team imported georeferenced cluster data points from the 2016 Ethiopia DHS and 2014 Kenya DHS. (Did you know? You can download shapefiles or geodatabases of georeferenced data for most DHS surveys from the Spatial Data Repository.)

Using the geospatial covariates and survey data, the Geospatial team employed a new modeling approach–a stacked ensemble model–which combines multiple models. This increases predictive power and captures the potentially complex interactions and non-linear effects among the geospatial covariates. Three sub-models were fit to the health indicator data using the geospatial covariates as exploratory predictors. The prediction surfaces generated from the sub-models were then used in the final Bayesian geospatial model, producing 5 X 5 km pixel-level mean estimates of health indicators with associated uncertainty.

Childhood Stunting by 5 X 5 km Pixel, 2016 Ethiopia DHS & 2014 Kenya DHS

Modeled surface maps available from the Spatial Data Repository.

Pixel-level estimates were then used to calculate population-weighted averages to aggregate estimates to the ADMIN 2 level. For Ethiopia, this produced estimates of childhood stunting by zone, and in Kenya, estimates by county.

Childhood Stunting by ADMIN 2 level, 2016 Ethiopia DHS & 2014 Kenya DHS

Health system program managers in Ethiopia and Kenya can now use these zonal- and county-specific estimates to make decisions and manage locally administered health programs to address childhood stunting in their areas.

The DHS Program will continue exploring model-based geostatistics as a feasible, reliable, and cost-effective way to produce local data for local needs.

Read the full report, Interpolation of DHS Survey Data at Subnational Administrative Level 2.

Explore available spatially modeled map surfaces of DHS indicators on the Spatial Data Repository.

29 Jan 2020

Luminare: Insights from a Malaria Consultative Meeting in Malawi

This blog post is part of Luminare, our blog series exploring innovative solutions to data collection, quality assurance, biomarker measurement, data use, and further analysis.


The DHS Program clearly loves data, but what good is collecting data if it is not used, or used only in isolation? This was the motivation behind a Malaria Data Consultative Meeting implemented by The DHS Program and co-facilitated by Dr. Katherine Battle of the Malaria Atlas Project in Malawi in July 2019.

Routine health surveillance data are continuously collected at health facilities in Malawi and entered into District Health Information Software 2 (DHIS2), giving a robust picture of malaria control in Malawi. For instance, each year, approximately six million malaria cases account for 30% of all outpatient visits at health facilities, 34% of inpatient hospital admissions, and 2,967 malaria-related hospital deaths.

The quality and completeness of DHIS2 data vary by facility and only data on people who seek and receive care are included. By contrast, household surveys, such as Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and Malaria Indicator Surveys (MIS), are representative of the general population, with comparable data for trend analysis and multi-country comparisons.

At the consultative meeting, malaria data experts developed and presented case studies on indicators that were found in both data sources to check for external consistency and evaluate progress towards Malawi’s Malaria Strategic Plan (MSP) targets. For instance, effective malaria case management is a key component of the 2017–2022 MSP, with targets to test 95% of suspected malaria cases and treat 100% of confirmed cases by 2022.

The DHIS2 data above depicts suspected malaria cases in children under 5 that received a confirmatory test at a health facility. The household survey data above represents children under 5 who had a fever in the previous 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought and who had blood taken from a finger or heel for diagnostic testing. See the table below for more information on these indicators.

 
Data sourceAvailable dataIndicatorNumeratorDenominator
DHIS22014–2018Percent of suspected malaria cases in children under 5 who received a confirmatory test at facility or village clinicNumber of suspected malaria cases in children under 5 who received a confirmatory testTotal number of suspected cases in children under 5 at facility or village clinic
Household survey data2014 Malawi MIS and 2017 Malawi MISPercent of children under 5 with fever in the previous 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought and who had blood taken from a finger or heel for testingNumber of children under 5 with fever in the previous 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought and who had blood taken from a finger or heel for testingTotal number of children under 5 with fever in the previous 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought

Adapted from Table 2 in Malaria Journal report.

Both the DHIS2 and MIS data show improvement in confirmatory testing of suspected cases over time, although absolute values differ. Differences were attributed to recall bias among survey respondents. Because the study populations (denominators) of the two datasets are different, it is more meaningful to compare trends rather than absolute values.

As countries move towards malaria elimination it is essential that programs begin monitoring performance using multiple data sources. By using routine surveillance data and household survey data together, malaria data experts have a more complete, unbiased picture of malaria in Malawi.

A report of this Malaria Data Consultative Meeting was published in the Malaria Journal. You can read it here!

Explore Malawi household survey data for yourself using STATcompiler.




 

Featured image caption: Participants from the Malaria Data Consultative Meeting in Malawi. ©ICF

07 Jan 2020

Introducing DHS Program Analysis Briefs

Over the last 30 years, The DHS Program has published more than 500 analytical reports in collaboration with researchers and institutions around the world. These reports extend to a wide variety of topics covering population and health issues with the ultimate purpose to be used in policy formation, program planning, and monitoring and evaluation. However, many potential beneficiaries of DHS Program research findings are intimidated by these long, technical reports.

In order to expand the reach of DHS analyses to program managers, policymakers, and academic researchers, The DHS Program is pleased to announce a new user-friendly format of analysis reports. Analysis Briefs are two- to three-page user-friendly documents summarizing the methods, key findings, and any relevant action steps.

 

Analysis Brief AB2 (shown above) provides the methodology and key results for Further Analysis 110: Maternal Health Indicators in High-Priority Counties of Kenya: Levels and Inequities.

These abbreviated, colorful briefs with graphics highlight major findings in a more accessible way that allow readers to use the findings for program or policy use in their respective country. If readers choose to dive into the full report, the brief still provides an orientation through the technical data in the full report. The graphics are presented in a simplified way to orient the information in a clear, visual display. Readers with limited time and attention are encouraged to review the accompanying briefs for a condensed summary of the full analysis report.

Briefs can be found on the full report publication summary page or by filtering by publication type ‘Analysis Briefs’ in The DHS Program publication search.

 
11 Dec 2019

Meeting Emerging Nutrition Data Needs in DHS-8

Nutrition is central to the health, well-being, and economic development of individuals, communities, and nations. Comprehensive and credible data are needed to capture the current state of nutrition and track the implementation of nutrition interventions. The DHS Program is a leading source of nutrition data in low and middle-income countries.

The DHS Program has standard Model Questionnaires, updated every 5 years, which form the basis for the data that are collected in each country. In 2019, we underwent a rigorous process to update the questionnaires for DHS-8. A total of 89 nutrition-related questions are now in the Woman’s Questionnaire, up from 54 questions in DHS-7.

The DHS-8 questionnaires meet several current and emerging nutrition data needs which can be used to track progress and inform national and global decisions on nutrition policies and programs. This week we are highlighting the new and revised nutrition questions in DHS-8.

These new and revised questions strengthen the nutrition portfolio in DHS surveys, filling major data gaps and enhancing countries’ ability to address malnutrition in all its forms.

Click the icon below to view the new nutrition information by topic:

Anthropometry Measurement
Nutrition Counseling
Food or Cash Assistance
Iron Supplementation
Minimum Dietary Diversity for Women
Unhealthy Foods for Children
Growth Monitoring
FIES

Click the life cycle below to view all nutrition data collected in DHS surveys:

When will updated nutrition data be available?

The DHS-8 Model Questionnaires will be ready for use in surveys with fieldwork starting in late 2020 with data released starting in late 2021. In the meantime, The DHS Program will:

  • Translate the questionnaires
  • Revise training manuals and materials
  • Develop an adaptation guide for questions which require country-specific adaptation, such as infant and young child feeding and minimum dietary diversity for women
  • Create data processing applications
  • Define indicators, design table templates, and draft report templates
  • Pilot select new questions, modules, and alternative approaches for entering data in CAPI

The status of DHS surveys can be found here.


Visit The DHS Program website and subscribe to The DHS Program Nutrition eNewsletter for more nutrition updates in The DHS Program. You can also join the Data for Nutrition Community of Practice as a free, online platform for more nutrition resources.

Featured Image: © 2017 Riccardo Gangale, USAID, Courtesy of Photoshare.

 
02 Dec 2019

16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence

The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence campaign is back in action for 2019 under the theme “Orange the World: Generation Equality Stands against Rape!” This year, The DHS Program is highlighting sexual and physical violence indicators, as well as help seeking behavior in Tajikistan, Pakistan, Nigeria, Benin, and Mali.

Click on a graph below to open the indicator in STATcompiler. Use STATcompiler to compare other domestic violence indicators across countries, and share your results on social media using #orangetheword and #generationeqaulity. You can even add additional background characteristics and view the data over time or by region. For more ways to use STATcompiler, watch our STATcompiler tutorials.

 

Still want to do more? Share these 16 days messages from UN Women’s social media toolkit. Additionally, try The DHS Program’s Gender mini tool to compare indicators of gender inequality, women’s empowerment, and gender norms all in one easy tool.

20 Nov 2019

From Participant to Facilitator: DHS Fellows from Myanmar and Egypt

The 2020 DHS Fellows Program is currently accepting applications from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Jordan, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Tajikistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Guinea, Mali, Rwanda, Senegal, and Zambia. Apply to join us for the DHS Fellows Program in 2020. The deadline to apply is November 24, 2019.

 

In this blog post, we interview two DHS Fellows who served as DHS Program workshop facilitators.

Dr. Kyaw Swa Mya is an Associate Professor and Head of Department of Biostatistics and Medical Demography at the University of Public Health, Yangon, Myanmar and Mr. Ehab Sakr is an assistant lecturer in the department of Demography and Bio-statistics at the Faculty of Graduate Studies for Statistical Research in Cairo University in Egypt. Both Fellows were both co-facilitators for the DHS Fellows Program (2019 and 2018, respectively) in addition to co-facilitating other DHS Program capacity strengthening workshops.

When was your first experience with the DHS Fellows Program?

KSM: In 2018, I was selected as part of a three-member team for the 2018 DHS Fellows Program from the University of Public Health, Yangon. We were the first Fellows from Myanmar where only one DHS survey has been conducted in 2015-2016. In Myanmar, most public health professionals, including myself, were not aware of DHS surveys.

ES: In January 2017, my colleagues and I were selected to be the first Egyptian team to participate in the 2017 DHS Fellows Program. I was eager for this opportunity because I used DHS data in my studies when I specialized in demography 17 years ago.

What was your experience as a DHS Fellows Program participant?

KSM: The Fellows Program provided many opportunities for the participants. First, we learned how DHS data was systematically collected and prepared for data users. Second, the Fellows Program improved our data management and analytical skills using STATA, as well as report writing skills. Third, as a requirement of the Fellows Program, we conducted capacity building activities at our University. These activities raised awareness among the Myanmar government and NGO public health professionals about using DHS data and DHS resources during planning, implementation, and evaluation of their health programs. We also disseminated the findings to stakeholders who impact policy implementation. Finally, we produced a DHS working paper that was published in the PLOS One journal.

ES: The Fellows Program was a great opportunity to enhance my knowledge about survey tools and improve my skills to use DHS data more efficiently and effectively. We were exposed to different cultures and academic trends from five other teams around the world. It’s also worth mentioning that implementing the capacity building project at our home university enriched my technical, teaching, and coaching skills. In two workshops facilitated by Dr. Wenjuan Wang and Dr. Shireen Assaf, we learned to use DHS data tools and techniques when analyzing DHS data. My teammates, Prof. Emeritus Mona Khalifa and Dr. Wafaa Hussein, and I wrote a DHS working paper titled “Changes in Contraceptive Use Dynamics in Egypt: Analysis of the 2008 and 2014 Demographic and Health Surveys.”

What was your experience as a facilitator?

KSM: The DHS Program gave me a second opportunity to participate in the DHS Fellows Program as a co-facilitator. I am thankful to The DHS Program for this opportunity. It was quite a challenging experience to be a co-facilitator. As a Fellow, I only needed to focus on my research topic, but as co-facilitator, I needed to learn all the research topics of participating countries. Moreover, I had to prepare lecture topics and this helped me become more familiar and confident with DHS methodology, analytical skills, and interpretation of the results.

ES: July 2019 was another great moment when I was asked to co-facilitate a workshop in Jordan on producing report tables using SPSS syntax at the Department of Statistics. It was a great experience communicating with lovely and skilled trainees, and we adapted to situations that forced us to customize the agenda of the workshop to suit the skills and knowledge of the trainees.

What impact has the DHS Fellows Program made on you?

KSM: The DHS Fellows Program changed my career, and DHS data has become a core part of my life. Since 2018, I published two journal articles and presented two oral presentations at the 10th and 11th International Conference on Public Health among Greater Mekong Sub-Regional Countries. One of my Masters in Public Health (MPH) students received a degree and I reviewed two master theses of two junior colleagues using DHS data and they achieved their master’s degree from foreign countries. I also received some emails from different countries asking for help with DHS coding and analysis challenges, and I helped them as far as I could. In addition, three of my MPH students prepared their proposals using DHS data this year. Myanmar is now realizing the data quality and accuracy of DHS indicators, so, not only academicians and students but also program managers and policymakers are using DHS indicators in relevant situations.

The DHS Fellow Program is one of the best and most effective programs that I have ever attended. I am grateful to USAID for providing financial and technical support to collect and disseminate quality data to monitor and evaluate population, health, and nutrition programs for developing countries.

ES: The DHS Fellows Program was life-changing and it gave me the opportunity to deepen my scientific and practical knowledge in an international, inspiring, creative, and diversified environment. Special thanks to USAID, The DHS Program team, and all the people I mentioned above. I learned a lot from them and hope to continue collaborating with them in the future.


Photo caption: Facilitators and participants from the 2018 DHS Fellows Data Analysis Workshop. ©ICF


Written by: Kyaw Swa Mya and Ehab Sakr

Dr. Kyaw Swa Mya is a Biostatistician. He is an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Biostatistics and Medical Demography, University of Public Health, Yangon, Myanmar. He holds a master’s degree in Public Health in Biostatistics. He is a member of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Public Health, Yangon. He currently works as a module supervisor of Diploma in Research Methodology and Research Ethics program conducted in the University of Medicine (I). His research interests are maternal and child health, nutrition, and non-communicable diseases.

Mr. Ehab Sakr is an assistant lecturer in the department of Demography and Bio-statistics, Faculty of Graduate Studies for Statistical Research, Cairo University in Egypt. He holds a master’s degree in Statistics from the Faculty of Economics and Political Science. His thesis theme was related to the levels and trends of age at first marriage for women in Egypt. He taught and consulted on various topics related to population dynamics and development and is currently a Ph.D. student.

06 Nov 2019

Reflections from the 2019 DHS Fellows Program: Senegal

The 2020 DHS Fellows Program is currently accepting applications from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Jordan, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Tajikistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Guinea, Mali, Rwanda, Senegal, and Zambia. The deadline to apply is November 24th.

 

The DHS Fellows Program was an opportunity for us to analyze DHS data, and we are particularly fortunate to live in Senegal, which released the Senegal Continuous Survey, providing nationally representative data annually between 2012 and 2018.

Prior to the Fellows Program we used DHS reports and results without knowing the methodology, data collection, analysis, and reporting work that was behind it. The possibility of using the data for secondary analysis was also unknown to us. The DHS Fellows Program allowed us to master the DHS survey structure, sampling design, and understand how to analyze population-based survey data using Stata software. The Fellows Program was a learning process, but it was also an opportunity for culture-sharing with other participants from diverse backgrounds such as Ghana, Ethiopia, Myanmar, Indonesia, and Afghanistan. Each group has advised the others in their work so everyone can present the best possible results. The co-facilitators of the Fellows program were former DHS Fellows and this gave us an opportunity to see Fellows alumni presenting their experiences with the program.

Click to view the 2019 DHS Fellows Facebook photo album

Thanks to the Fellows Program, we are better equipped to use this data again in other future work and have shared it with our colleagues during our capacity building activities. Some colleagues are already hoping to participate in future Fellows Program or other DHS workshops. This program not only allowed us to better understand the DHS surveys, but also make in-depth statistical analyses and to use DHS data to write analysis reports.

Download the DHS Working Paper authored by the Senegalese DHS Fellows participants, Coverage and Associated Factors for HIV Screening in Senegal: Further Analysis of the 2017 Demographic and Health Survey.

We were one of the first Francophone teams to participate in the Fellows Program, which initially caused us some apprehension.  The call for applications required a skilled level of English as the course is taught in English, but thanks to the availability of our facilitators, Shireen, Wenjuan, and co-facilitators, Kyaw and Gedefaw, we did very well!

We could never thank ICF and The DHS Program enough for this amazing experience. In addition, we formed a real family with teams from other countries. We strongly recommend that researchers from French-speaking countries submit their applications for the 2020 DHS Fellows Program.

 

Featured photo caption: Dr. Khardiata Diallo Mbaye, Prof. Cheikh Tidiane Ndour, and Dr. Ndeye Aïssatou Lakhe at the 2019 DHS Fellows Report Writing Workshop. ©ICF


Written by: Ndeye Aïssatou Lakhe, Prof. Cheikh Tidiane Ndour, and Dr. Khardiata Diallo Mbaye

Dr. Ndeye Aïssatou Lakhe is a medical doctor specializing in infectious and tropical diseases. She currently works as a lecturer in infectious diseases at the Faculty of Medicine of Dakar. She is also a practicing MD at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases at Fann Teaching Hospital, the third largest hospital in Dakar. She is the head of the Infection and Prevention Control (IPC) committee of the hospital. Her interests are in policy making, particularly in IPC and health program evaluation.

Prof. Cheikh Tidiane Ndour is a Professor of infectious and tropical diseases, working in the Department of Diseases at the Fann University Hospital and the Faculty of Medicine at the Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar. He has been the head of the AIDS and STI Control Division of the Ministry of Health for the last three years. His current focus is the implementation of innovative strategies to achieve the 90-90-90 strategy: identify 90% of people infected by HIV, put 90% of identified HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral treatment, and ensure that 90% of those on ART have undetectable viral loads, in accordance with commitments to the international community.

Dr . Khardiata Diallo Mbaye specializes in Infectious and tropical diseases. She works as a teacher/researcher at the University Cheikh Anta DIOP at the Faculty of Medicine of Dakar, and as a physician at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases at Fann Teaching Hospital. She also specializes in public health.

22 Oct 2019

Journey Mapping Methods: Results from a Study on Place of Delivery

Data from the World Health Organization (WHO) estimate that, globally, 289,000 women of reproductive age die of maternal causes each year. Over 80% of these deaths are due to complications during childbirth and the postpartum period. Skilled birth attendance at health facilities equipped to handle complications is crucial for ensuring maternal survival. While Kenya has made progress in improving maternal health services in the last decade, data from the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey show that less than two-thirds of births are delivered in a health facility.

The DHS Program recently published a study on place of delivery and shared the results with county stakeholders and USAID project implementers at dissemination events in Kisumu, Turkana, Nakuru, and Nairobi counties. One aim of the study was to explore the “why” questions that sometimes are left unanswered with indicator estimates and other quantitative analysis; specifically: Why do women in Kenya deliver at home, even in instances when health facilities appear to be available?

Click photos to enlarge.

Exploring this research question included the use of journey mapping methods. In particular, the data collection tools were designed with the aim of mapping the journey for Kenyan women from the time when they learn they are pregnant to when and where they give birth.

A journey mapping approach recognizes that often a journey does not follow a straight line; instead, a journey—from pregnancy to delivery in this case—includes many economic, familial, and sociocultural factors that must be navigated along the way. In addition, the focus on mapping journeys works to uncover the story related to a woman’s delivery experience.

Data from the study suggest that place of delivery is not as simple as grouping women into the dichotomy of those who choose to deliver in a health facility and those who choose to deliver outside a health facility. Numerous factors influence place of delivery, and women do not necessarily always choose the place of delivery. The study’s conclusions recognize that contextual factors and decision making pertaining to place of delivery are complex. The pregnancy-to-delivery continuum follows an ever-shifting terrain influenced by myriad individual and collective beliefs, perceptions, tensions, and experiences.

Key Conclusions: Understanding the Nuances of a Women’s Journey along the Pregnancy-to-Delivery Continuum

  • Decision making occurs over time
  • Limited options for services to address fears and insecurities
  • Gendered views regarding male partner involvement in health care
  • Geographic and transportation challenges
  • Free maternity care is not always free
  • Expectation of support and respectful maternal care not always met
  • Prominence of and preferences for traditional birth attendant (TBA)
  • Challenges negotiating decisions and power dynamics in a marriage or partnership
  • Hesitancy of health facilities to accommodate for traditional practice
  • Potential reliance on financial support from male partners

The conclusions from this study represent a platform to galvanize momentum and facilitate a commitment to take positive steps forward. Past and present strategies and programs put into operation by USAID/Kenya, the Government of Kenya, and their partners have made substantial progress in improving the uptake of optimal maternal and child health practices. Research studies such as this one—and the use of journey mapping methods—can make a valuable contribution to knowledge about both the context in which women experience pregnancy and delivery and the specific challenges they face along the pregnancy-to-delivery continuum.

Download the full study, “Place of Delivery: Perceptions, Tensions, and Experiences. Results from a Study in Baringo, Kisumu, Migori, Samburu, and Turkana Counties, Kenya” on The DHS Program website.


Photo gallery captions (left to right):

  1. Participants at the Kisumu County dissemination and data use workshop, August 1, 2019. © ICF
  2. Participants at the Turkana County dissemination and data use workshop, August 5, 2019. © ICF
  3. Participants at the Nakuru County dissemination and data use workshop, July 29, 2019. © ICF
  4. Participants at the Nairobi dissemination and data use workshop, July 17, 2019. The group included Nairobi-based stakeholders as well as key stakeholders who traveled to Nairobi from Baringo, Kisumu, Migori, Nakuru, Samburu, and Turkana counties. © ICF
10 Oct 2019

DHS-8 Questionnaires

The DHS Program is pleased to share our updated questionnaires for DHS-8. We held an open comment period in early 2019 and received over 1,000 pages of material from stakeholders worldwide. After careful consideration of each submission, we made numerous changes to better meet existing and emerging data needs in global health. We are especially excited to announce the shift from a birth history to a full pregnancy history and the addition of minimum dietary diversity for women.

We added 183 new questions across all health areas, revised existing questions to better measure current indicators, and deleted questions that were no longer programmatically relevant. We have also expanded into new areas, including alcohol consumption and breast and cervical cancer screening. Additional changes to DHS optional modules and a list of new modules will be announced later this year.

In addition to the updated questionnaires, a brief summary document was developed highlighting the revision process and new content included in the core questionnaires. Revisions were made to the majority of topics including, family planning, nutrition, gender, HIV, vaccination, and more.

Learn more about the DHS-8 questionnaire revisions by the numbers in the infographic below.

Visit The DHS Program to learn more about the standard model questionnaires for all types of surveys.

Featured image: © 2017 Magali Rochat VectorWorks, Courtesy of Photoshare

24 Sep 2019

Global Goals Week 2019

Global Goals Week is back with a full week of action, awareness, and accountability for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals. The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Program collects demographic and health indicators to calculate approximately 30 of the indicators supporting the SDGs.

These indicators and more can be found in STATcompiler, a tool that allows users to create custom tables, charts, and maps. Use the SDG tag to select from a list of SDG indicators and view them by background characteristics, overtime, and across countries.

This week we are highlighting three Global Goals using DHS data from five recent DHS surveys. Click an SDG indicator in the infographic below and compare the indicators of demand for family planning satisfied by modern methods, secondary education, and age at first marriage in Albania, Benin, Jordan, Mali, and Pakistan. Customize the tables by background characteristics or trends over time to create your own data visualization. Share your results with the #GlobalGoals community.

Share this infographic on Facebook and Twitter, and don’t forget to tag #GlobalGoals to engage with others in this global conversation!

The information provided on this Web site is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

The DHS Program, ICF
530 Gaither Road, Suite 500, Rockville, MD 20850
Tel: +1 (301) 407-6500 • Fax: +1 (301) 407-6501
dhsprogram.com

Anthropometry measurement (height and weight) is a core component of DHS surveys that is used to generate indicators on nutritional status. The Biomarker Questionnaire now includes questions on clothing and hairstyle interference on measurements for both women and children for improved interpretation.